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research-article

Efficacy Investigation of Virtual Reality Teaching Module in Manufacturing System Design Course

[+] Author and Article Information
Junfeng Ma

ASME Member, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Industrial & Systems Engineering, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762
ma@ise.msstate.edu

Raed Jaradat

Assistant Professor, Dept. of Industrial & Systems Engineering, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762
jaradat@ise.msstate.edu

Omar Ashour

Assistant Professor, Dept. of Industrial Engineering, Penn State University-Behrend, Erie, PA 16563
oma110@psu.edu

Michael Hamilton

Assistant Research Professor, Institute for Systems Engineering Research, Vicksburg, MS 39180
michaelh@iser.msstate.edu

Parker Jones

Research Engineer, Institute for Systems Engineering Research, Vicksburg, MS 39180
parkerj@iser.msstate.edu

Vidanelage Dayarathna

Graduate Research Assistant, Industrial & Systems Engineering Department, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762
vld66@msstate.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4041428 History: Received January 18, 2018; Revised September 03, 2018

Abstract

Manufacturing system design is a complex engineering field that requires cooperated and aggregated multiple-disciplinary theoretical and practical support. Thereby, the concepts and topics in manufacturing system design courses are not easy to grasp by students. Advances in virtual reality (VR) technology present a new opportunity that can provide the implementation of complex engineering theory from industrial real-life practice in a virtual 3D model. The authors developed a unique queuing theory VR teaching module that can be used in a manufacturing system design course. The module uses Oculus Rift headset, Oculus Touch and Unity 3D software package. The efficacy of this VR teaching module is measured through simulation sickness, system usability and user experience tools. The statistical analysis shows that VR teaching module is a user-friendly and efficient tool for delivering queueing theory. Approximately 91.7% of the participants experienced below moderate level simulation sickness and none of them withdrew from the study; 91.67% had "above average" satisfaction in terms of system usability. The average user experience was found to be 3.625 out 6. The results also show that the system usability has impact on students' knowledge gain but not motivation, while user experience can affect student's knowledge gain and motivation. VR teaching module outperforms the traditional teaching module in terms of knowledge gain and motivation. Overall, the findings of the study confirm the efficacy of VR technology in teaching queuing theory.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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