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research-article

Design for Manufacturability-Based Feedback to Mitigate Design Fixation

[+] Author and Article Information
Esraa Abdelall

Iowa State University, Department of Industrial and Manufacturing System Engineering, 3004 Black Engineering, 2529 Union Drive, Ames, IA, 50011, USA
abdelallesra@gmail.com

Matthew C. Frank

Iowa State University, Department of Industrial and Manufacturing System Engineering, 3004 Black Engineering, 2529 Union Drive, Ames, IA, 50011, USA
mfrank@iastate.edu

Richard Stone

Iowa State University, Department of Industrial and Manufacturing System Engineering, 3004 Black Engineering, 2529 Union Drive, Ames, IA, 50011, USA
rstone@iastate.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4040424 History: Received December 07, 2017; Revised May 20, 2018

Abstract

This study assessed the effectiveness of 3D visual feedback from design for manufacturability (DFM) software on mitigating design fixation on non-producible manufacturability features. Whereas design fixation studies focus on fixation caused by exposure to prior solution and its effect on novelty and functionality of designs, a recent study showed that migrating design between manufacturing processes (e.g. Additive to Conventional manufacturing) can cause fixation on non-producible manufacturability features. In this work, a fixation group and a defixation group were asked to design a basic product for additive manufacturing (DFAM) and then to modify the next iteration for conventional machining. The fixation group relied on their self-assessment while modifying, while the defixation group utilized DFM software feedback. Results showed that 3D feedback reduced design fixation on non-producible features and improved the machinability of modified designs. Findings suggest the use DFM software for treating the design fixation related to additive manufacturing and for facilitating migration of designs from additive to conventional manufacturing. This work could be applied to manufacturing industries, particularly where AM is used for prototyping, or when demand for part changes and an AM part needs to migrate to conventional methods.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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