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Research Papers: Design of Mechanisms and Robotic Systems

Membrane-Enhanced Lamina Emergent Torsional Joints for Surrogate Folds

[+] Author and Article Information
Guimin Chen

State Key Laboratory for
Manufacturing Systems Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710049, China;
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Brigham Young University,
Provo, UT 84602

Spencer P. Magleby, Larry L. Howell

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Brigham Young University,
Provo, UT 84602

Contributed by the Mechanisms and Robotics Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MECHANICAL DESIGN. Manuscript received September 3, 2017; final manuscript received March 24, 2018; published online April 17, 2018. Assoc. Editor: David Myszka.

J. Mech. Des 140(6), 062303 (Apr 17, 2018) (10 pages) Paper No: MD-17-1601; doi: 10.1115/1.4039852 History: Received September 03, 2017; Revised March 24, 2018

Lamina emergent compliant mechanisms (including origami-adapted compliant mechanisms) are mechanical devices that can be fabricated from a planar material (a lamina) and have motion that emerges out of the fabrication plane. Lamina emergent compliant mechanisms often exhibit undesirable parasitic motions due to the planar fabrication constraint. This work introduces a type of lamina emergent torsion (LET) joint that reduces parasitic motions of lamina emergent mechanisms, and presents equations for modeling parasitic motion of LET joints. The membrane joint also makes possible one-way joints that can ensure origami-based mechanisms emerge from their flat state (a change point) into the desired configuration. Membrane-enhanced LET (M-LET) joints, including one-way surrogate folds, are described here and show promise for use in a wide range of compliant mechanisms and origami-based compliant mechanisms. They are demonstrated as individual joints and in mechanisms such as a kaleidocycle (a 6R Bricard linkage), degree-4 origami vertices (spherical mechanisms), and waterbomb base mechanisms (an 8R multi-degrees-of-freedom origami-based mechanism).

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Figures

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Fig. 1

A lamina emergent four-bar mechanism that utilizes LET joints as its revolute pairs [1]

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Fig. 2

(a) An outside LET and (b) its intended deflection

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Fig. 3

(a) An inside LET and (b) its intended deflection

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Fig. 4

In-plane parasitic motion of an outside LET joint, including (a) tensile deflection (translation along the y-axis) and (b) in-plane rotational deflection (rotation around the z-axis)

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Fig. 5

In-plane parasitic motion of an inside LET joint, including (a) tensile deflection (translation along the y-axis) and (b) in-plane rotational deflection (rotation around the z-axis)

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Fig. 6

Tensile/compressive stiffness comparison of outside and inside LET joints. Joint parameters: L = 30 mm, W = 1.5 mm, T = 1.5 mm, and E=1.4×109 Pa.

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Fig. 7

In-plane rotational stiffness comparison of inside and outside LET joints. The parameters of the joints are: L = 30 mm, T = 1.5 mm, W = 1.5 mm, C = 2 mm, D = 5 mm, and E=1.4×109 Pa.

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Fig. 8

Various M-LET joint designs

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Fig. 9

A sandwich membrane-enhanced outside LET joint. The LETs are made of polypropylene and the membrane from metallic glass: (a) parts, (b) undeflected position, and (c) deflected position.

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Fig. 10

A bilayer membrane-enhanced outside LET joint. The LET is made of polypropylene and the membrane from metallic glass: (a) parts, (b) undeflected position, and (c) deflected position.

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Fig. 11

Constraint space and freedom space of a sheet flexure

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Fig. 12

Realization of unidirectional foldability of M-LET joints (bilayer structure) by adding stop blocks (with the gaps exaggerated) combined with a bilayer structure

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Fig. 13

Kaleidocycle with joints replaced by outside LET joints fabricated in acrylic

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Fig. 14

Kaleidocycles employing membrane-enhanced LET joints. The LET joint is made of polypropylene, and the membranes are from metallic glass.

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Fig. 15

Thick degree-4 vertex using bilayer structure M-LET joints: (a) front and (b) back

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Fig. 16

Different folding positions of the thick degree-4 vertex

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Fig. 17

Thick degree-4 vertex using a bilayer structure that enforces mountain and valley parity

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Fig. 18

Different folding positions of the thick degree-4 vertex

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Fig. 19

A thick waterbomb base at its undeflected position. Unidirectionally foldable membrane-enhanced LET joints (bilayer structure) for surrogate mountain/valley folds (the membrane is attached on the back for each mountain fold, while the membrane is attached on the front for each valley fold). A dark membrane is used for mountain folds and a transparent membrane for valley folds.

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Fig. 20

The thick waterbomb base at different folded positions. The LETs are made of acrylic and the membranes from polyvinyl chloride.

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Fig. 21

A thick waterbomb base at its undeflected position. Unidirectionally foldable membrane-enhanced LET joints (bilayer structure) for surrogate mountain/valley folds (the membrane is attached on the back for each mountain fold, while the membrane is attached on the front for each valley fold).

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Fig. 22

The thick waterbomb base at different folded positions. It is made of polypropylene and a composite tape for the membrane.

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