0
research-article

A study of design fixation related to Additive Manufacturing

[+] Author and Article Information
Esraa Abdelall

Iowa State University, Department of Industrial and Manufacturing System Engineering, 3004 Black Engineering, 2529 Union Drive, Ames, IA, 50011 , USA
abdelallesra@gmail.com

Matthew C. Frank

Iowa State University, Department of Industrial and Manufacturing System Engineering, 3004 Black Engineering, 2529 Union Drive, Ames, IA, 50011 , USA
mfrank@iastate.edu

Richard Stone

Iowa State University, Department of Industrial and Manufacturing System Engineering, 3004 Black Engineering, 2529 Union Drive, Ames, IA, 50011 , USA
rstone@iastate.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4039007 History: Received July 11, 2017; Revised January 05, 2018

Abstract

This study aims to understand the effect of additive manufacturing (AM) on designer fixation. Whereas previous research illustrates the positive aspects of additive manufacturing, the overarching hypothesis of this work is that it might also have negative effects with respect to conventional manufacturability. In this work, participants from two groups, a Design for Conventional Manufacturing (DfCM) group, and a Design for Additive Manufacturing (DfAM) group were asked to design a basic product. Then, a second iteration of design asked both groups to design for conventional processes; to include subtractive and formative methods like machining and casting, respectively. In the study, the DfAM group showed evidence of fixation on non-producible features and consequently had harder to conventionally manufacture designs in the second iteration, even when told specifically to design for conventional manufacturing. There was also evidence that the complex designs of the DfAM group limited their modeling success and seemed to encourage them to violate more design constraints. This study draws attention toward the effect of the knowledge and use of additive manufacturing technologies on designers and provides motivation for treatment methods. This is important if additive manufacturing is used in prototyping or short run production of parts that are slated for conventional manufacturing later. The issue of design fixation is not a problem, of course, if Additive Manufacturing is the final manufacturing method; a more common practice every day. This work suggests that one should consider possibility of fixation in design environments where AM precedes larger volume conventional manufacturing.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In