0
Research Papers: Design of Direct Contact Systems

A Novel Method for Producing a Conical Skiving Tool With Error-Free Flank Faces for Internal Gear Manufacture

[+] Author and Article Information
Yi-Pei Shih

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
National Taiwan University of
Science and Technology,
No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road,
Taipei 106, Taiwan
e-mail: shihyipei@mail.ntust.edu.tw

Yun-Jun Li

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
National Taiwan University of
Science and Technology,
No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road,
Taipei 106, Taiwan

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Power Transmission and Gearing Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MECHANICAL DESIGN. Manuscript received July 8, 2017; final manuscript received November 6, 2017; published online February 27, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Qi Fan.

J. Mech. Des 140(4), 043302 (Feb 27, 2018) (9 pages) Paper No: MD-17-1463; doi: 10.1115/1.4038567 History: Received July 08, 2017; Revised November 06, 2017

Power skiving for internal gears has drawn increased industry attention in recent years because it has higher precision and productivity than gear shaping or broaching. Yet even though the commonly adopted conical skiving tool has better wear resistance than the cylindrical one, when known design methods are used, the tool geometry is still subject to profile errors. This paper therefore proposes a novel design method for the conical skiving tool and establishes a mathematical model of error-free flank faces. These faces are formed by conjugating the cutting edges on the rake faces—derived from a group of generating gears with progressively decreasing profile-shifted coefficients—with the work gear. A mathematical model of the work gear tooth surfaces produced by the cutting edges (over flank faces) of tool at different resharpened depths is then adopted to examine the tooth surface deviations produced with their theoretical equivalents. The results verify the correctness of the mathematical models.

Copyright © 2018 by ASME
Topics: Gears , Cutting , Errors , Gear teeth
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Kojima, M. , 1974, “ On the Clearance Angles of Skiving Cutter,” Bull. JSME, 17(105), pp. 401–408. [CrossRef]
Stadtfeld, H. J. , 2014, “ Power Skiving of Cylindrical Gears on Different Machine Platforms,” Gear Technol., January/February, pp. 52–62.
Chen, X. C. , Li, J. , and Lou, B. C. , 2013, “ A Study on the Design of Error-Free Spur Slice Cutter,” Int. J. Adv. Manuf. Technol., 68(1–4), pp. 727–738. [CrossRef]
Guo, E. , Hong, R. , Huang, X. , and Fang, C. , 2014, “ Research on the Design of Skiving Tool for Machining Involute Gears,” J. Mech. Sci. Technol., 28(12), pp. 5107–5115. [CrossRef]
Guo, E. , Hong, R. , Huang, X. , and Fang, C. , 2016, “ A Novel Power Skiving Method Using the Common Shaper Cutter,” J. Adv. Manuf. Technol., 83(1–4), pp. 157–165. [CrossRef]
Tsai, C.-Y. , 2016, “ Mathematical Model for Design and Analysis of Power Skiving Tool for Involute Gear Cutting,” Mech. Mach. Theory, 101, pp. 195–208. [CrossRef]
Moriwaki, I. , Osafune, T. , Nakamura, M. , Funamoto, M. , Uriu, K. , Murakami, T. , Nagata, E. , Kurita, N. , Tachikawa, T. , and Kobayashi, Y. , 2017, “ Cutting Tool Parameters of Cylindrical Skiving Cutter With Sharpening Angle for Internal Gears,” ASME J. Mech. Des., 139(3), p. 033301. [CrossRef]
Rogers, D. F. , and Adams, J. A. , 1990, Mathematical Elements for Computer Graphics, 2nd ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, Chap. 5.
Litvin, F. L. , and Fuentes, A. , 2004, Gear Geometry and Applied Theory, 2nd ed., Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK. [CrossRef]

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Conical skiving tool

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Construction of conventional skiving cutter tooth flanks

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Cutting edge profile data points

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Coordinate systems between the skiving cutter and work gear

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Contact curves between the skiving tool cutting edge and the internal gear: (a) Instantaneous contact curves and (b) transverse section

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Barrel-shaped generating gear

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Tooth flank construction in an error-free skiving tool

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Flowchart for deriving the mathematical model of an error-free conical skiving tool flank face

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Profiles of the conventional skiving tool on the transverse plane

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Three-dimensional model of the conical skiving tool created by solidworks

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Flank topographic deviations of the ring gear produced by the conventional skiving tool corresponding to the sharpened depth ξi=0

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Deviations of the ring gear produced by the conventional skiving tool corresponding to the resharpened depth

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Profiles of the error-free skiving cutter on the rake face

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Flank topographic deviations of the ring gear produced by the error-free skiving cutter with sharpened depth ξi=0

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

Deviations of the ring gear produced by the error-free skiving cutter corresponding to the sharpened depth

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 16

Deviations of the cutting edges of the conventional versus the error-free tool when ξi ranges from 0 to 10 mm

Tables

Errata

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In