0
Research Papers: Design Theory and Methodology

Capturing Human Sequence-Learning Abilities in Configuration Design Tasks Through Markov Chains

[+] Author and Article Information
Christopher McComb

Mem. ASME
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Carnegie Mellon University,
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
e-mail: ccm@cmu.edu

Jonathan Cagan

Fellow ASME
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Carnegie Mellon University,
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
e-mail: cagan@cmu.edu

Kenneth Kotovsky

Department of Psychology,
Carnegie Mellon University,
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
e-mail: kotovsky@cmu.edu

Contributed by the Design Theory and Methodology Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MECHANICAL DESIGN. Manuscript received November 14, 2016; final manuscript received June 16, 2017; published online July 12, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Katja Holtta-Otto.

J. Mech. Des 139(9), 091101 (Jul 12, 2017) (12 pages) Paper No: MD-16-1761; doi: 10.1115/1.4037185 History: Received November 14, 2016; Revised June 16, 2017

Designers often search for new solutions by iteratively adapting a current design. By engaging in this search, designers not only improve solution quality but also begin to learn what operational patterns might improve the solution in future iterations. Previous work in psychology has demonstrated that humans can fluently and adeptly learn short operational sequences that aid problem-solving. This paper explores how designers learn and employ sequences within the realm of engineering design. Specifically, this work analyzes behavioral patterns in two human studies in which participants solved configuration design problems. Behavioral data from the two studies are first analyzed using Markov chains to determine how much representation complexity is necessary to quantify the sequential patterns that designers employ during solving. It is discovered that first-order Markov chains are capable of accurately representing designers' sequences. Next, the ability to learn first-order sequences is implemented in an agent-based modeling framework to assess the performance implications of sequence-learning abilities. These computational studies confirm the assumption that the ability to learn sequences is beneficial to designers.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Example Markov chain with three states

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Example truss operation sequences, with numbers corresponding to the list of truss operations

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Example cooling system operation sequence, with numbers corresponding to the list of system operations and shading indicating room temperatures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Summary of results for truss design study, including (a) log-likelihood computed for models of increasing accuracy, (b) transition matrix of first-order Markov model, and (c) state frequencies for zero-order Markov model

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Thresholded graph-based visualization of the first-order Markov model for the truss design study. Transition probabilities are depicted by the line thickness (or circle edge thickness for self-transitions).

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Exemplar sequences extracted from the first-order Markov model for truss design study

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Summary of results for cooling system design study, including (a) log-likelihood computed for models of increasing accuracy, (b) transition matrix of first-order Markov model, and (c) state frequencies for zero-order Markov model

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Thresholded graph-based visualization of the first-order Markov model for the cooling system design study. Transition probabilities are depicted by the line thickness (or circle edge thickness for self-transitions).

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Exemplar sequences extracted from the first-order Markov model for cooling system design study

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Comparison of truss design quality for zero-order Markov model, first-order Markov model, and human performance on the truss design problem (error bars show ±1 SE)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Comparison of cooling system design quality for zero-order Markov model, first-order Markov model, and human performance on the cooling system design problem (error bars show ±1 SE)

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In