0
Research Papers: Design of Mechanisms and Robotic Systems

Thumb Configuration and Performance Evaluation for Dexterous Robotic Hand Design

[+] Author and Article Information
Hairong Wang

The State Key Laboratory of
Robotics and System,
Harbin Institute of Technology,
Harbin 150001, China
e-mail: h.wang.hit@gmail.com

Shaowei Fan

The State Key Laboratory of
Robotics and System,
Harbin Institute of Technology,
Harbin 150001, China
e-mail: fswhit@gmail.com

Hong Liu

The State Key Laboratory of
Robotics and System,
Harbin Institute of Technology,
Harbin 150001, China
e-mail: dlrhitlab@aliyun.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Mechanisms and Robotics Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MECHANICAL DESIGN. Manuscript received March 14, 2016; final manuscript received September 15, 2016; published online November 11, 2016. Assoc. Editor: David Myszka.

J. Mech. Des 139(1), 012304 (Nov 11, 2016) (12 pages) Paper No: MD-16-1208; doi: 10.1115/1.4034837 History: Received March 14, 2016; Revised September 15, 2016

The force and/or motion transmissibility and the analyticity of inverse kinematics for a thumb mechanism depend on thumb configuration. This paper presents a general framework for the thumb configuration and performance evaluation in the design of dexterous robotic hand. The thumb configuration is described by the functional analysis of human thumb, and the thumb of robotic hand is generalized into 15 configurations. A performance evaluation method is proposed based on kinetostatic and dynamic dexterity as well as workspace. The kinetostatic dexterity is based on a Jacobian matrix condition number (JMCN). A dynamic dexterity measure is presented via acceleration analysis, which keeps a clear geometric meaning. The proposed method is applied to evaluate the performance of three examples, which cover thumb configurations of most existing dexterous hands. Performance evaluation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Using these results and the proposed performance evaluation method, meaningful design principles are presented to guide the design of the thumb configuration.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Thumb anatomy: (a) joints and bones [7,8] and (b) biomechanical rotation axes [9]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Thumb configurations: (a)–(f) 211 type thumb, (g)–(j) 221 type thumb, and (k)–(p) 311 type thumb. Ai(i = 1,2,…,5) indicates the axis of the thumb joints.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Discretization method describing workspace based on the Monte Carlo method. The cell size Δx × Δy × Δz is determined according to trade-off between accuracy and the number of cells [49].

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Kinematic models and the D–H coordinate frames of three examples. (a) Variant of configuration (p). There is a fixed angle ρ between joint 1 and the thumb axis. l3, l4, and l5 are the lengths of their phalanxes, respectively. The finger length L is equal to l3 + l4 + l5. The appearance characteristic parameter l isdescribed as L2+d2. (b) Variant of configuration (d). There is a fixed twist angle ρ between joints 2 and 3. l2, l3, and l4 are the lengths of their phalanxes, respectively. The finger length L is equal to l2 + l3 + l4. The appearance characteristic parameter l is described as L + d. (c) Configuration (h). l2, l4, and l5 are the lengths of their phalanxes, respectively. The finger length L is equal to l2 + l4 + l5, which is the appearance characteristic parameter l.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Atlases of KDIW for a variant of configuration (p). To illustrate the atlases clearly, areas A–D are divided.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Atlases of KDIW for a variant of configuration (d). To illustrate the atlases clearly, areas A–D are divided.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Atlases of KDIW for configuration (h). To illustrate the atlases clearly, areas A and B are divided.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Global performance atlases of each element of KDIW for a variant of configuration (p): (a) WGI, (b) WVI, (c) Ia, (d) Iv (IJ), (e) IH, and (f) VΩ

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Global performance atlases of each element of KDIW for a variant of configuration (d): (a) WGI, (b) WVI, (c) Ia, (d) Iv (IJ), (e) IH, and (f) VΩ

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Global performance atlases of each element of KDIW for configuration (h): (a) WGI, (b) WVI, (c) Ia, (d) Iv (IJ), (e) IH, and (f)VΩ

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Comparison of the performance for the seven typical configurations. It is good to be far away from the center.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

The HIT-DLR II Hand: (a) photograph and (b) relationship between R and k

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In