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Design Innovation Paper: Design Innovation Paper

Design, Modeling and Testing of a Two-Terminal Mass Device With a Variable Inertia Flywheel

[+] Author and Article Information
Shuai Yang, Tongyi Xu, Ming Liang, Natalie Baddour

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Ottawa,
Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada

Chuan Li

Engineering Laboratory for Detection,
Control and Integrated System,
Chongqing Technology and Business University,
Chongqing 400067, China

1Corresponding authors.

Contributed by the Mechanisms and Robotics Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MECHANICAL DESIGN. Manuscript received June 9, 2016; final manuscript received July 4, 2016; published online August 1, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Ettore Pennestri.

J. Mech. Des 138(9), 095001 (Aug 01, 2016) (10 pages) Paper No: MD-16-1432; doi: 10.1115/1.4034174 History: Received June 09, 2016; Revised July 04, 2016

In this paper, we present a flywheel that can adaptively generate variable equivalent mass in response to application requirements. The motivation for the design comes from the need to achieve passive inertial mass, which eventually will lead to passive vibration isolation. This flywheel features a “host” flywheel frame with four sliders, each in a separate track. As the rotational speed of the variable inertia flywheel changes, the distance between sliders and rotation center changes, leading to a variable equivalent mass. The mathematical model of the flywheel is developed to examine its performance. The flywheel is mounted on a two-terminal hydraulic device to test its behavior. Experimental work has also been carried out to identify the parameters of the system (hydraulic device plus flywheel). The mathematical model with the identified parameters is then validated experimentally. During the experiments, the variable inertial force generated by the variable inertia flywheel in response to the changes in the excitation inputs is in good agreement with the prediction of the mathematical model, with the exception of spikes due to backlash of the two-terminal hydraulic system. The proposed design and experimental approach could inspire other passive variable inertial mass control of vibration systems.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

The variable inertia flywheel: (a) schematic diagram and (b) prototype (note: 1—spring, 2—inner hole for the shaft, 3—slot, 4—slider, and 5—frame)

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Fig. 2

The two-terminal hydraulic device (note: 1—terminal 1, 2—release valve, 3—hydraulic cylinder, 4—hydraulic motor, 5—pressure gauge, 6—holding shaft of the flywheel, and 7—terminal 2) (Fabricated by the Engineering Laboratory for Detection, Control and Integrated System, Chongqing Technology and Business University, China)

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Fig. 3

Schematic diagram of the two-terminal hydraulic device with a variable inertia flywheel

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Fig. 4

Mechanical model of the two-terminal hydraulic system

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Fig. 5

Test rig for the variable inertia flywheel (note: 1—force cell, 2—two-terminal hydraulic system, 3—computer, 4—actuator, and 5—controller)

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Fig. 6

Comparison of the measured forces and calculated forces based on the estimated ba and Ff. (a) Velocity input (frequency = 0.5 Hz, amplitude = 0.005 m/s), (b) measured and calculated forces corresponding to the velocity input in (a), (c) velocity input (frequency = 1 Hz, amplitude = 0.01 m/s), and (d) measured and calculated forces corresponding to the velocity input in (c).

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Fig. 7

The variable behavior of the flywheel moment of inertia and equivalent mass: (a) sinusoidal velocity input (frequency = 0.1 Hz, amplitude = 0.0314 m/s), (b) slider location (i.e., the distance between slider centroid and flywheel rotational center) that varies in response to the velocity input in (a), (c) the variable moment of inertia of the flywheel associated with the slider location presented in (b), and (d) the variable equivalent mass of the flywheel due to the location change of the sliders

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Fig. 8

Comparison of the measured forces and calculated forces based on the estimated k. (a) Velocity input (frequency = 0.4 Hz, amplitude = 0.012 m/s), (b) measured and calculated forces corresponding to the velocity input in (a), (c) velocity input (frequency = 2 Hz, amplitude = 0.063 m/s), and (d) measured and calculated forces corresponding to the velocity input in (c).

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Fig. 9

The comparison of measured forces and calculated forces using the mathematical model. (a) Comparison between measured and calculated forces with a velocity input of low frequency and amplitude (0.4 Hz, 0.012 m/s), (b) comparison between measured and calculated forces with an input of middle frequency and amplitude (1 Hz, 0.0314 m/s), and (c) comparison between measured and calculated forces with an input of high frequency and amplitude (2 Hz, 0.126 m/s).

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