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Research Papers: Design of Direct Contact Systems

An Accurate and Efficient Approach to Undeformed Chip Geometry in Face-Hobbing and Its Application in Cutting Force Prediction

[+] Author and Article Information
Mohsen Habibi

Mechanical and Industrial
Engineering Department,
Concordia University,
CAD/CAM Lab. EV 12.165,
1515 Street Catherine Street West,
Montreal, QC H3G 1M8, Canada
e-mail: mohs_hab@encs.concordia.ca

Zezhong Chevy Chen

Mechanical and Industrial
Engineering Department,
Concordia University,
CAD/CAM Lab. EV 12.165,
1515 Street Catherine Street West,
Montreal, QC H3G 1M8, Canada
e-mail: zcchen@encs.concordia.ca

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Power Transmission and Gearing Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MECHANICAL DESIGN. Manuscript received May 25, 2015; final manuscript received November 9, 2015; published online December 14, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Qi Fan.

J. Mech. Des 138(2), 023302 (Dec 14, 2015) (11 pages) Paper No: MD-15-1391; doi: 10.1115/1.4032090 History: Received May 25, 2015; Revised November 09, 2015

Due to complexities of face-hobbing of bevel gears, such as the intricate geometry of the cutting system, multi-axis machine tool kinematic chains, and the variant cutting velocity along the cutting edge, deriving the instantaneous undeformed chip geometry, as one of the most important characteristic of material removal, is a challenging process. In the present research, all these complexities have been taken into consideration to obtain an in-process model and undeformed chip geometry, and predict cutting forces. The instantaneous undeformed chip geometry is obtained using the derived in-process model. As an application of the proposed methods, cutting forces are predicted during face-hobbing by oblique cutting theory using the derived undeformed chip geometry and converting face-hobbing into oblique cutting. The proposed methods are applied on two case studies of face-hobbing of bevel gears and the chip geometry is derived and the cutting forces are predicted.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
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Copyright © 2016 by ASME
Topics: Cutting , Geometry , Blades
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Figures

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Fig. 4

The engagement of two blade groups with jth disk

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Fig. 6

Differential cutting force components

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Fig. 3

Intersection between cutting edge and a disk

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Fig. 2

Discretization of the workpiece along Z3 by Δz

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Fig. 7

The in-process model of 100th disk for different cutting system rotation angle, θ, the green area is the removed area

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Fig. 8

Total cutting force estimated in the workpiece coordinate system in face-hobbing of case I for the outside O.B. (nb = 1) and inside I.B. (nb = 13) blades

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Fig. 1

Formate machine tool structure and the workpiece setup

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Fig. 5

An example of undeformed chip geometry derived using the proposed methods at θ = 16,234 deg and BO = 7.908 mm

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Fig. 10

The undeformed chip thickness and cutting force distribution along the cutting edge, top (left and right): outside blade and bottom (left and right): inside blade

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Fig. 9

Total cutting force estimated in the workpiece coordinate system in face-hobbing of case I for the outside O.B. (nb = 1) and inside I.B. (nb = 20) blades

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