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PAPERS: Multimaterial Design Methods for AM

An Investigation of Key Design for Additive Manufacturing Constraints in Multimaterial Three-Dimensional Printing

[+] Author and Article Information
Nicholas Meisel

Mem. ASME
Design, Research, and Education for
Additive Manufacturing Systems Laboratory,
Virginia Tech,
410 Goodwin Hall,
635 Prices Fork Road,
Blacksburg, VA 24061
e-mail: meiselna@vt.edu

Christopher Williams

Mem. ASME
Design, Research, and Education for
Additive Manufacturing Systems Laboratory,
Virginia Tech,
413D Goodwin Hall,
635 Prices Fork Road,
Blacksburg, VA 24061
e-mail: cbwill@vt.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Design for Manufacturing Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MECHANICAL DESIGN. Manuscript received February 12, 2015; final manuscript received June 15, 2015; published online October 12, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Carolyn Seepersad.

J. Mech. Des 137(11), 111406 (Oct 12, 2015) (9 pages) Paper No: MD-15-1093; doi: 10.1115/1.4030991 History: Received February 12, 2015; Revised June 15, 2015

The PolyJet material jetting process is uniquely qualified to create complex, multimaterial structures. However, key manufacturing constraints need to be explored and understood in order to guide designers in their use of the PolyJet process including (1) minimum manufacturable feature size, (2) removal of support material, (3) survivability of small features, and (4) the self-supporting angle in the absence of support material. The authors use a design of experiments (DOE) approach to identify the statistical significance of geometric and process parameters and to quantify the relationship between these significant parameters and part manufacturability. The results from this study include the identification of key variables, relationships, and quantitative design thresholds necessary to establish a preliminary set of design for additive manufacturing (DfAM) guidelines for material jetting. Experimental design studies such as the one in this paper are crucial to provide designers with the knowledge to ensure that their proposed designs are manufacturable with the PolyJet process, whether designed manually or by an automated method, such as topology optimization (TO).

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Copyright © 2015 by ASME
Topics: Design , Manufacturing
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Figures

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Fig. 1

Representation of direct 3D PolyJet printing process

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Fig. 2

Optimized compliant inverters manufactured via PolyJet AM [13]

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Fig. 4

Minimum feature specimen

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Fig. 3

Mean support material removed at each candidate channel area

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Fig. 5

Significant interaction plots—minimum feature

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Fig. 7

Self-supporting angle specimen: (a) as-designed and (b) printed

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Fig. 6

Mean survivability for each candidate diameter (value of 2 denotes “survived”)

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Fig. 8

Mean self-supported angle for each candidate orientation

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