0
PAPERS: Part Design Methods and Specification Challenges in AM

Level Set Topology Optimization of Printed Active Composites

[+] Author and Article Information
Kurt Maute

Professor
Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences,
University of Colorado at Boulder,
Boulder, CO 80309-0429
e-mail: kurt.maute@colorado.edu

Anton Tkachuk

Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences,
University of Colorado at Boulder,
Boulder, CO 80309-0429
e-mail: anton.tkachuk@colorado.edu

Jiangtao Wu

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Georgia Institute of Technology,
Atlanta, GA 30332
e-mail: jiangtaowu@gatech.edu

H. Jerry Qi

Associate Professor
School of Mechanical Engineering,
Georgia Institute of Technology,
Atlanta, GA 30332
e-mail: qih@me.gatech.edu

Zhen Ding

Digital Manufacturing and Design Centre,
Singapore University of Technology and Design,
487372, Singapore
e-mail: zhen_ding@sutd.edu.sg

Martin L. Dunn

Professor Digital Manufacturing and Design Centre,
Singapore University of Technology and Design,
487372, Singapore
e-mail: martin_dunn@sutd.edu.sg

Contributed by the Design for Manufacturing Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MECHANICAL DESIGN. Manuscript received February 14, 2015; final manuscript received May 25, 2015; published online October 12, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Carolyn Seepersad.

J. Mech. Des 137(11), 111402 (Oct 12, 2015) (13 pages) Paper No: MD-15-1109; doi: 10.1115/1.4030994 History: Received February 14, 2015; Revised May 25, 2015

Multimaterial polymer printers allow the placement of different material phases within a composite, where some or all of the materials may exhibit an active response. Utilizing the shape memory (SM) behavior of at least one of the material phases, active composites can be three-dimensional (3D) printed such that they deform from an initially flat plate into a curved structure. This paper introduces a topology optimization approach for finding the spatial arrangement of shape memory polymers (SMPs) within a passive matrix such that the composite assumes a target shape. The optimization approach combines a level set method (LSM) for describing the material layout and a generalized formulation of the extended finite-element method (XFEM) for predicting the response of the printed active composite (PAC). This combination of methods yields optimization results that can be directly printed without the need for additional postprocessing steps. Two multiphysics PAC models are introduced to describe the response of the composite. The models differ in the level of accuracy in approximating the residual strains generated by a thermomechanical programing process. Comparing XFEM predictions of the two PAC models against experimental results suggests that the models are sufficiently accurate for design purposes. The proposed optimization method is studied with examples where the target shapes correspond to a plate-bending type deformation and to a localized deformation. The optimized designs are 3D printed and the XFEM predictions are compared against experimental measurements. The design studies demonstrate the ability of the proposed optimization method to yield a crisp and highly resolved description of the optimized material layout that can be realized by 3D printing. As the complexity of the target shape increases, the optimal spatial arrangement of the material phases becomes less intuitive, highlighting the advantages of the proposed optimization method.

Copyright © 2015 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Conceptual PAC layout

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Conceptual steps of LSM–XFEM topology optimization for PAC design

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Comparison of experimental and XFEM results: fixity over fiber orientation

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Composite plate model for PAC validation study

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Setup for 3D PAC layout optimization problem—localized deformation configuration

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

Printed PAC sample in undeformed configuration and in programed stage (ii) for cosine wave target shape

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Layout of active phase for parabolic target shape

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Optimized PAC designs in programed stage (ii) for parabolic target shape

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Evolution of shape mismatch and perimeter in optimization process for parabolic target shape

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Setup for 3D PAC layout optimization problem—plate-bending configuration

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Layout of active phase for cosine wave target shape

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Optimized PAC designs in programed stage (ii) for cosine wave target shape

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 16

Layout of active phase for twisted parabolic bending target shape

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 17

Optimized PAC designs in programed stage (ii) for twisted parabolic bending target shape

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 18

Printed PAC sample in undeformed configuration and in programed stage (ii) for twisted parabolic bending target shape

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Printed PAC sample in undeformed configuration and in programed stage (ii) for parabolic target shape

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 19

Layout of active phase for single bulge target shape

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 20

Optimized PAC designs in programed stage (ii) for single bulge target shape

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 21

Printed PAC sample in undeformed configuration and in programed stage (ii) for single bulge target shape

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In