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Research Papers: Power Transmissions and Gearing

Tooth Contact Analysis for a Double-Crowned Involute Helical Gear With Twist-Free Tooth Flanks Generated by Dual-Lead Hob Cutters

[+] Author and Article Information
Van-The Tran

Mechanical and
Aeronautical Engineering,
Feng Chia University,
100 Wenhwa Rd., Seatwen,
Taichung 40724, Taiwan
e-mail: vanct4.hut@gmail.com

Ruei-Hung Hsu

Assistant Professor
Precision System Design,
Feng Chia University,
100 Wenhwa Rd., Seatwen,
Taichung 40724, Taiwan
e-mail: rhhsu@fcuoa.fcu.edu.tw

Chung-Biau Tsay

Chair Professor
Department of Mechanical
and Computer-Aided Engineering,
Feng Chia University,
100 Wenhwa Rd., Seatwen,
Taichung 40724, Taiwan
e-mail: cbtsay@mail.nctu.edu.tw

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Power Transmission and Gearing Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MECHANICAL DESIGN. Manuscript received July 31, 2014; final manuscript received January 2, 2015; published online March 5, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Qi Fan.

J. Mech. Des 137(5), 052601 (May 01, 2015) (11 pages) Paper No: MD-14-1463; doi: 10.1115/1.4029586 History: Received July 31, 2014; Revised January 02, 2015; Online March 05, 2015

To double-crown an involute helical gear, a hobbing method is proposed by setting the hob's diagonal feed motion as a second-order function of hob's traverse movement and modifying the tooth profile of hob cutter into a dual-lead form with pressure angle changed in its longitudinal direction. Merits of the proposed double-crowning method are also verified by using three computer simulation examples to illustrate and compare the topographies of tooth flanks, contact ellipses, and transmission errors under various assembly errors of the double-crowned gear pairs with those produced by using the conventional modified hob cutter and dual-lead hob cutter. Computer simulation results reveal the advantages of the proposed hobbing method for involute helical gear manufacturing.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Surface parameters of rack cutters: (a) conventional modified tooth profile; and (b) dual-lead tooth profile

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Fig. 2

Coordinate systems of the schematic generation mechanism for hob cutters

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Fig. 3

Coordinate systems for the finish-hobbing of work gear with longitudinal crowning teeth

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Fig. 4

Simulation of meshing gear pairs with gear assembly errors

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Fig. 5

Normal deviation of position vectors for a double-crowned tooth flank surface

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Fig. 6

Topography of crowned work gear surfaces hobbed by the conventional modified hob cutter (Mce=57.4 μm and Rce=0.01)

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Fig. 7

Topography of crowned work gear surfaces hobbed by the dual-lead hob cutter (Mce = 0.6 μm and Rce = 0.98)

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Fig. 8

Simulated tooth contact ellipses and contact points of the gear pairs meshing under ideal contact condition. Gears generated by: (a) conventional modified hob cutter and (b) dual-lead hob cutter.

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Fig. 9

Transmission errors of the gear pairs meshing under ideal contact condition. Gears generated by: (a) conventional modified hob cutter and (b) dual-lead hob cutter.

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Fig. 10

Simulated tooth contact ellipses and contact points of the gear pairs meshing under center distance error ΔE=1 mm. Gears generated by: (a) conventional modified hob cutter and (b) dual-lead hob cutter.

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Fig. 11

Transmission errors of the gear pairs meshing under center distance error ΔE=1 mm. Gears generated by: (a) conventional modified hob cutter and (b) dual-lead hob cutter.

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Fig. 12

Simulated tooth contact ellipses and contact points meshing under vertical misalignment Δγv=0.1 deg. Gears generated by: (a) conventional modified hob cutter and (b) dual-lead hob cutter.

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Fig. 13

Transmission errors of the gear pairs meshing under vertical misalignment Δγv=0.1 deg. Gears generated by: (a) conventional modified hob cutter and (b) dual-lead hob cutter.

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Fig. 14

Simulated tooth contact ellipses and contact points meshing under horizontal misalignment Δγh=0.1 deg. Gears generated by: (a) conventional modified hob cutter and (b) dual-lead hob cutter.

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Fig. 15

Transmission errors meshing under horizontal misalignment Δγh = 0.1 deg. Gears generated by: (a) conventional modified hob cutter and (b) dual-lead hob cutter.

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