0
Research Papers

Challenges in Designing Mechatronic Systems

[+] Author and Article Information
Jonas Mørkeberg Torry-Smith

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Technical University of Denmark,
Copenhagen, Denmark
e-mail: jtor@mek.dtu.dk

Ahsan Qamar

Department of Machine Design,
School of Industrial Engineering
and Management,
KTH Royal Institute of Technology,
Stockholm 10044, Sweden
e-mail: ahsanq@kth.se

Sofiane Achiche

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Design and Manufacturing Section,
École Polytechnique de Montréal,
University of Montreal,
Montreal H3T 1J4, Quebec, Canada
e-mail: sofiane.achiche@polymtl.ca

Jan Wikander

Department of Machine Design,
School of Industrial Engineering
and Management,
KTH Royal Institute of Technology,
Stockholm 10044, Sweden
e-mail: janwi@kth.se

Niels Henrik Mortensen

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Technical University of Denmark,
Copenhagen, Denmark
e-mail: nhmo@mek.dtu.dk

Carl During

Micronic Mydata AB,
Box 3141, 18303 Täby, Sweden
e-mail: carl.during@micronic-mydata.com

This paper is an extension to the article published in the proceedings of the ASME 2011 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences & Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2011 [2]. The literature study has been expanded from three to five years which revealed an additional 10 articles, thus adding 200 references to be included in the data processing. Furthermore, structured searches in seven relevant journals have been added to the literature study to identify mechatronic challenges. As a result, additional researchers and solutions have been identified and included.

The Domain Theory in Ref. [46] is also described in Ref. [47].

Contributed by the Mechanisms and Robotics Committee of ASME for publication in the Journal of Mechanical Design. Manuscript received February 13, 2012; final manuscript received September 28, 2012; published online December 7, 2012. Assoc. Editor: Craig Lusk.

J. Mech. Des 135(1), 011005 (Nov 21, 2012) (11 pages) Paper No: MD-12-1114; doi: 10.1115/1.4007929 History: Received February 13, 2012; Revised September 28, 2012

Development of mechatronic products is traditionally carried out by several design experts from different design domains. Performing development of mechatronic products is thus greatly challenging. In order to tackle this, the critical challenges in mechatronics have to be well understood and well supported through applicable methods and tools. This paper aims at identifying the major challenges, by conducting a systematic and thorough survey of the most relevant research work in mechatronic design. Solutions proposed in literature are assessed and illustrated through a case study in order to investigate if the challenges can be handled appropriately by the methods, tools, and mindsets suggested by the mechatronic community. Using a real-world mechatronics case, the paper identifies the areas where further research is required, by showing a clear connection between the actual problems faced during the design task and the nature of the solutions currently available. From the results obtained from this research, one can conclude that although various attempts have been developed to support conceptual design of mechatronics, these attempts are still not sufficient to help in assessing the consequences of selecting between alternative conceptual solutions across multiple domains. We believe that a common language is essential in developing mechatronics, and should be evaluated based on: its capability to represent the desired views effectively, its potential to be understood by engineers from the various domains, and its effect on the efficiency of the development process.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2013 by ASME
Topics: Design , Mechatronics
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

(a) Instrument, (b) watch, (c) temperature unit, (d) heart-rate sensor, and (e) charger for instrument

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Main electronic components

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

The custom made gasket and the part in which it has to be inserted

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

The PCB and the positioning of the flex print and the flex print terminal

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In