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Research Papers

Design for Assembly Guidelines for High-Performance Compliant Mechanisms

[+] Author and Article Information
Prasanna Gandhi

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology,
Bombay 400076, India
e-mail: gandhi@me.iitb.ac.in

Kaustubh Sonawale

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,
University of California,
Irvine, CA 92697
e-mail: ksonawal@uci.edu

Vaibhav Soni

Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering,
University of California,
Davis, CA 95616
e-mail: vvsoni@ucdavis.edu

Naved Patanwala

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology,
Bombay 400076, India
e-mail: navedp.037@gmail.com

Arvind Bansode

Research and Development Establishment (Engineers),
Defense Research & Development Organization (DRDO),
Pune 411015, India
e-mail: arvindfb@rediffmail.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Design Automation Committee of ASME for publication in the Journal of Mechanical Design. Manuscript received February 8, 2012; final manuscript received September 30, 2012; published online November 15, 2012. Assoc. Editor: Shinji Nishiwaki.

J. Mech. Des 134(12), 121006 (Nov 15, 2012) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4007928 History: Received February 08, 2012; Revised September 30, 2012

Compliant mechanisms with ultrahigh precision motion are being increasingly used for several applications including micromeasurement, micro/nanomanipulation, microfabrication, and so on. Flexure linkages offer inherent advantages of being frictionless, highly repeatable, and having great design flexibility. Monolithic fabrication of these mechanisms limits the use of multiple materials for optimized design and is expensive or infeasible especially for three-dimensional mechanisms. An alternative method of assembling components of a compliant mechanism is considered in this paper and design for assembly guidelines are put forth. It is found that if each of the connections of a compliant mechanism is constrained exactly using two pins as per the traditional practice, internal stresses are generated in the links and their warping does not allow the desired operation of the mechanism. The proposed guidelines, which are based on Grubler’s criteria, include a simple formulation to determine number of locating pins to be used in the entire assembly. Further, these guidelines also determine the locations of these pins. Several compliant mechanisms were fabricated and assembled using these guidelines and were found to be working satisfactorily.

Copyright © 2012 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 5

Case 2: Four link compliant mechanism with five pins and hole misalignment: simulated and actual views illustrating no tilting of stage and warp-free links

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Fig. 4

A zero DOF three-dimensional four bar structure connected using five pins

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Fig. 3

(a) Tilt of stage as seen in the actual mechanism, (b) warping of the link as seen in the actual mechanism, (c) isometric view of the deformed position of the stage and links after inserting the extra pin 6, (d) tilt of the stage and warping of links as seen by FEM analysis, and (e) tilt of the stage and warping of links seen by FEM analysis. Case 1: four link compliant mechanism with six pins and hole misalignment: simulated and actual views illustrating tilt of stage and warping introduced

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Fig. 2

A zero DOF 3D four bar structure connected using six pins

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Fig. 1

Double parallelogram compliant mechanism

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Fig. 6

Configurations possible for three and four link mechanism

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Fig. 7

Configurations possible for five link mechanism

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Fig. 9

Two links to be assembled to have zero DOF

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Fig. 10

Assembly with one full joint and one half joint (higher pair)

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Fig. 8

Configurations possible for seven link mechanism

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Fig. 11

Fully constrained four link configuration with number of full joints j = 3 less than number of links

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Fig. 14

CAD model of a double parallelogram compliant mechanism

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Fig. 12

CAD model of the special case

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Fig. 13

2D representation of the special case

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Fig. 15

2D representation of the double flexural parallelogram mechanism

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Fig. 18

2D representation of the six link outer loop and its disintegration into the fundamental configurations

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Fig. 19

Compound double parallelogram flexure mechanism

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Fig. 16

Double parallelogram compliant mechanism

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Fig. 17

CAD model of the compound double parallelogram flexure mechanism

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Fig. 23

Displacement amplifying flexural mechanism

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Fig. 20

CAD model of the displacement amplifying flexural mechanism

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Fig. 21

2D representation of the displacement amplifying flexural mechanism

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Fig. 22

2D representation of the displacement amplifying flexural mechanism with 28 full joints (filled dots) and 10 half joints (hollow dots)

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