0
Technical Briefs

Considering Landowner Participation in Wind Farm Layout Optimization

[+] Author and Article Information
Le Chen1

Ames Laboratory Affiliated Researcher, Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50010lechen@iastate.edu

Erin MacDonald

Ames Laboratory Affiliated Researcher, Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50010erinmacd@iastate.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Mech. Des 134(8), 084506 (Jul 24, 2012) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006999 History: Received July 20, 2011; Revised June 04, 2012; Published July 24, 2012; Online July 24, 2012

Current wind farm layout optimization research assumes a continuous piece of land is readily available and focuses on advancing optimization methods. In reality, projects rely on landowners’ permission for success. When a viable site is identified, local residents are approached for permission to build turbines on their land, typically in exchange for monetary compensation. Landowners play a crucial role in the development process, and some land parcels are more important to the success of project than others. This paper relaxes the assumption that a continuous piece of land is available, developing a novel approach that includes a model of landowner participation rates. A genetic algorithm (GA) is adopted to solve the nonlinear constrained optimization problem, minimizing cost and maximizing power output. The optimization results show that, given a projected participation rate, we can identify the most crucial plots prior to the negotiation process with landowners. This will ultimately increase the efficiency of wind farm development.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Problem representation

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Wind distribution for multidirectional nonuniform wind scenario [7-8,12,15]

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Binary string representation of X

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Wake loss model [7-8,15,31]

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Unidirectional uniform wind case (a) example optimal layouts

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Unidirectional uniform wind case (b) example optimal layouts

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Unidirectional uniform wind case (c): unique optimal layout

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Multidirectional nonuniform cases (a),(b), and (c) unique optimal layout

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Wake loss region for 4 cells

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In