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Research Papers

An Enhanced CMM Model for the Accurate Prediction of Steady-State Performance of CVT Chain Drives

[+] Author and Article Information
G. Carbone

Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Gestionale, Politecnico di Bari, viale Japigia 182, 70126 Bari, Italy

L. De Novellis

Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Gestionale, Politecnico di Bari, v.le Japigia 182, 70126 Bari, Italy; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, 5612 AZ Eindhoven, The Netherlands

G. Commissaris

 Gear Chain Industrial b.v., De Huufkes 104, 5674 TM Nuenen, The Netherlands

M. Steinbuch

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, 5612 AZ Eindhoven, The Netherlands

J. Mech. Des 132(2), 021005 (Jan 22, 2010) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000833 History: Received June 04, 2009; Revised November 30, 2009; Published January 22, 2010; Online January 22, 2010

The paper deals with the theoretical and experimental evaluation of the performance of a continuously variable transmission chain drive in steady-state conditions. We propose an enhanced version of the Carbone–Mangialardi–Mantriota (CMM) model, to accurately predict the slip behavior and the traction performance of the variator. To achieve this objective, it is necessary to accurately estimate the elastic displacements of the pulley. The determination of the actual pulley deformation allows to obtain a better estimation of the sliding velocities between the pins and the pulley surfaces and, therefore, to calculate the amount of total slip between the primary and secondary pulleys with a higher degree of accuracy. In contrast to multibody models, the approach presented here has a very simple formulation and results in an easy implementation, which allows a complete and fast evaluation of the variator working points. The theoretical results are discussed and critically compared with experimental data. The comparison confirms the validity of the CMM approach in a large range of clamping forces, speed ratios and torque loads.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

A schematic (a) and a photograph (b) of the GCI chain made of pins, strip, and links properly connected. Only the pins touch the surface of the pulley sheaves and transmit normal and frictional force.

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Figure 2

The kinematical and geometric quantities: (a) planar view and (b) 3D view.

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Figure 3

The forces acting on the belt.

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Figure 4

A comparison between the traction coefficients on the driven pulley (a) and on the drive side (b) obtained by employing the original CMM model (black) and the improved CMM model (red). Calculations refer to the following data: τ=1, SDN=20 kN, and ωDR=500 RPM.

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Figure 5

The power-loop test rig at the automotive Engineering Science Laboratory, Eindhoven University of Technology. The GCI chain is mounted on the CVT variator on the right.

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Figure 6

Power-loop test rig layout. Pressure circuit in solid lines and lubrication circuit in dashed.

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Figure 7

Clamping force ratio as a function of the speed ratio τ under no load conditions (the primary torque is TDR=0 Nm) and for different values of the secondary clamping force: SDN=5 kN (a), SDN=10 kN (b), SDN=15 kN (c), and SDN=20 kN (d). In all cases the primary speed is ωDR=2000 RPM.

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Figure 8

Clamping force ratio as a function of the speed ratio τ, under load conditions (the primary torque is TDR=30 Nm) and for different values of the secondary clamping force: SDN=5 kN (a), SDN=10 kN (b), SDN=15 kN (c), and SDN=20 kN (d). In all cases the primary speed is ωDR=3000 RPM.

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Figure 9

Clamping force ratio as a function of the speed ratio τ under load conditions (the primary torque is TDR=70 Nm) and for different values of the secondary clamping force: SDN=15 kN (a) and SDN=20 kN (b). In all cases the primary speed is ωDR=3000 RPM.

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Figure 10

Theoretical predicted and experimental measured tration curves (ωDR=500 RPM,  SDN=15 kN) for different values of the geometric ratio: τid=0.5 ((a) and (b)), τid=1 ((c) and (d)), and τid=2 ((e) and (f)).

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Figure 11

Theoretical predicted and experimental measured tration curves (ωDR=500 RPM,  SDN=20 kN) for different values of the geometric ratio: τid=0.5 ((a) and (b)), τid=1 ((c) and (d)), and τid=2 ((e) and (f)).

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Figure 12

The primary clamping force SDR(kN) as a function of the slip σ (a) and the slip trend as a function of the time t(s) during a traction experiments. The primary speed is ωDR=500 RPM and the secondary clamping force is SDN=15 kN.

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