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Research Papers

Development of a Vehicle Modeling Function for Three-Dimensional Shape Optimization

[+] Author and Article Information
Joo-Hyun Rho

School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, B/D 301-1213 Shinrim9-dong, Kwanak-ku, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Koreaboondo0@snu.ac.kr

Yo-Cheon Ku

School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, B/D 301-1213 Shinrim9-dong, Kwanak-ku, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Koreayogoe9@snu.ac.kr

Jung-Do Kee

Research Development Division, Hyundai Motors Company, 772-1 Jangduk-dong, Hwaseong-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 445-706, Republic of Koreajdkee@hyundai-motor.com

Dong-Ho Lee1

School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Institute of Advanced Aerospace Technology, Seoul National University, B/D 301-1302 Shinrim9-dong, Kwanak-ku, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Koreadonghlee@snu.ac.kr

1

Corresponding author.

J. Mech. Des 131(12), 121004 (Nov 10, 2009) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000404 History: Received August 15, 2008; Revised August 11, 2009; Published November 10, 2009; Online November 10, 2009

Representation of a complex three-dimensional (3D) shape requires extensive computer-aided design data consisting of millions (or tens of millions) of approximated discontinuous points. The quantity of data makes it difficult or impossible to efficiently optimize the entire shape. We present a vehicle-modeling function in the form of an exponential function to smoothly express the complex two-dimensional and 3D curved shapes of an automobile. This modeling function can modify and optimize the shape with fewer design variables compared with ordinary point-fitting methods. The subsectional parts of the vehicle-modeling function are defined as section functions by classifying each subsection of the automobile configuration as a section box model. The proposed approach is suitable for remodeling existing automobiles and for newly designed automobiles. The entire 3D aerodynamic shape of an automobile can be created using a set of the proposed modeling functions, which define a combination of section boxes. A 3D aerodynamic shape was developed to verify that the optimization of the shape was practical. This capability may help to reduce the developmental time or cost of automobiles and similarly complex systems. In addition, the proposed approach can be expanded to other fields of engineering.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Definition of automobile section box

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Figure 2

Vehicle-modeling function

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Figure 3

Automobile hood shape representation using B-spline curves

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Figure 4

Automobile hood shape representation using the modeling-function curve

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Figure 5

Variation in the parameters of the modeling function

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Figure 6

Top-view sections through the modeling function

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Figure 7

2D configurations for the four-box car (compare with Table 2): (1) hood, (2) roof, (3) trunk, (4) underbody, (5) top view, (6) upper, and (7) lower

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Figure 8

Representation of sedan car shape (compare with Table 3): (1) hood, (2) roof, (3) trunk, (4) underbody, (5) top view, (6) front upper 1, (7) front upper 2, (8) front lower, (9) rear upper, and (10) rear lower

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Figure 9

Representation of unconventional car shape (PT Cruiser) (compare with Table 4): (1) hood, (2) roof, (3) trunk, (4) underbody, (5) front upper 1, and (6) front lower

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Figure 10

Establishment of 3D functional car model from the initial section box

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Figure 11

Interactive GUI for controlling the modeling function and the expression of geometric parameters and views

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Figure 12

Shape design optimization process using modeling function

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Figure 13

Car shape optimization using modeling function

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Figure 14

Prototype manufacturing using modeling function for wind-tunnel test

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