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Research Papers

ResQuake: A Tele-Operative Rescue Robot

[+] Author and Article Information
S. Ali A. Moosavian1

Advanced Robotics and Automated Systems (ARAS) Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Khaje Nasir Toosi University of Technology, P.O. Box 19395-1999, Tehran 19991 43344, Iranmoosavian@kntu.ac.ir

Arash Kalantari

Advanced Robotics and Automated Systems (ARAS) Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Khaje Nasir Toosi University of Technology, P.O. Box 19395-1999, Tehran 19991 43344, Iranarash1362@yahoo.com

Hesam Semsarilar

Advanced Robotics and Automated Systems (ARAS) Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Khaje Nasir Toosi University of Technology, P.O. Box 19395-1999, Tehran 19991 43344, Iranhesam2k@yahoo.com

Ehsan Aboosaeedan

Advanced Robotics and Automated Systems (ARAS) Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Khaje Nasir Toosi University of Technology, P.O. Box 19395-1999, Tehran 19991 43344, Iranehsanaboo@yahoo.com

Ehsan Mihankhah

Advanced Robotics and Automated Systems (ARAS) Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Khaje Nasir Toosi University of Technology, P.O. Box 19395-1999, Tehran 19991 43344, Iranehsanmihankhah@yahoo.com

1

Corresponding author.

J. Mech. Des 131(8), 081005 (Jul 20, 2009) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3179117 History: Received July 21, 2008; Revised May 07, 2009; Published July 20, 2009

The design procedure of ResQuake as a tele-operative rescue robot and its dynamics analysis, manufacturing procedure, control system, and slip estimation for performance improvement are discussed. First, the general task to be performed by the robot is defined, and various mechanisms to form the basic structure of the robot are discussed. Choosing the appropriate mechanisms, geometric dimensions, and mass properties are detailed to develop kinematic and dynamic models for the system. Next, the strength of each component is analyzed to finalize its shape, and the mechanism models are presented. Then, the control system is briefly described, which includes the operator’s PC as the master processor, and the laptop installed on the robot as the slave processor. Finally, slip coefficients of tracks are identified and validated by experimental tests to improve the system tracking performance. ResQuake has participated with distinction in several rescue robot leagues.

Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 5

(a) Making the tracks collinear to reduce the width of robot and (b) final mechanism chosen for the tracks

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Figure 6

The path for motion of the arms

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Figure 7

Planetary gear chain

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Figure 8

Final designed arrangement for the arms

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Figure 9

Top: latex pieces fixed on the chain; bottom: basic structure of the suspension system

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Figure 1

ResQuake in different conditions; (left) folded tracks, (right) extended tracks climbing up a ramp uneven surface

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Figure 2

Two types of locomotion systems encountering the same obstacle

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Figure 3

(a) Minimum length for tracks of the robot and (b) minimum turning radius of a simple track robot

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Figure 4

(a) Preliminary design of just front tracks (arm) and (b) improved design with two pairs of arms (front and rear)

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Figure 19

Obtained and filtered data; (a) velocity along x axis, (b) velocity along y axis, and (c) angular velocity

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Figure 20

Experimental results of tracking on a circular path with the diameter of 3 m (top), and heading angles (bottom) with and without slippage compensation; (a) velocity=0.1 m/s, (b) velocity=0.25 m/s

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Figure 10

Main lengths for determining the other dimensions

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Figure 11

The robot moving on a circular path

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Figure 12

Forces acting on the robot on a circular path

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Figure 13

Free body diagram of the robot on a 35 deg slope

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Figure 14

Locomotion arms under the weight of the robot

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Figure 15

Free body diagram of the planetary gear set

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Figure 16

The suggested structure for the planetary gear set

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Figure 17

Correlation of the main parts of the control system

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Figure 18

Experimental results; (a) expected and observed tracking performance on circular path with the diameter of 3 m, (b) tracking on a path with the diameter of 4 m, (c) heading angle on the first path, and (d) heading angle on the second path

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