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Research Papers

Theoretical Analysis of Transmission Error in Helical Synchronous Belt With Error on Belt Side Face Under Bidirectional Operation

[+] Author and Article Information
Masanori Kagotani

Department of Mechanical Engineering for Transportation, Osaka Sangyo University, 3-1-1 Nakagaito, Daito-shi, Osaka 574-8530, Japankagotani@tm.osaka-sandai.ac.jp

Hiroyuki Ueda

Department of Mechanical Engineering for Transportation, Osaka Sangyo University, 3-1-1 Nakagaito, Daito-shi, Osaka 574-8530, Japanueda@tm.osaka-sandai.ac.jp

J. Mech. Des 131(8), 081004 (Jul 15, 2009) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3086795 History: Received March 27, 2008; Revised December 12, 2008; Published July 15, 2009

Synchronous belt drives are occasionally required to transmit rotation accurately and are often employed in bidirectional operation. For transmission error per single pitch of the pulley, a helical synchronous belt with a helix angle of the tooth trace is effective. However, this belt causes axial movement because of the axial belt tooth load. When the belt comes into contact with the pulley flange or the belt moves away from the pulley flange due to bidirectional operation, the accuracy of finishing on the belt side face affects the transmission error. In the present study, the transmission error considering the error on the belt side face in a helical synchronous belt drive that uses flanged pulleys under the quasistatic condition and transmitted torque was investigated theoretically and experimentally for the case in which the pulley was rotated in bidirectional operation. The calculated transmission error coincided well with the experimentally obtained transmission error. Under forward rotation, the transmission error having a period of one rotation of the belt is caused by the error on the belt side face when the belt comes into contact with the pulley flange. Under reverse rotation, the transmission error is generated by a change in the belt tension due to the application of a transmitted torque and by the difference in axial belt movements between the driving and driven sides when the belt moves away from the pulley flange.

Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: Rotation , Errors , Pulleys , Belts , Flanges
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Axial belt movement in bidirectional operation

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Figure 2

Rotational direction of pulley

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Figure 3

Model of axial belt movement in forward rotation for one belt rotation

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Figure 4

Movement of belt side face at position A under forward rotation

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Figure 5

Meshing condition at position B during reverse rotation

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Figure 6

Generating model of transmission error in forward rotation for one belt rotation

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Figure 7

Generating model of transmission error in reverse rotation for one belt rotation

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Figure 8

Experimental apparatus for measuring transmission error

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Figure 9

Experimental and calculated results of axial belt movement

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Figure 10

Error on belt side face used in experiment and calculation

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Figure 11

Experimental and calculated results of transmission error in forward rotation

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Figure 12

Calculated axial belt movement at beginning of meshing in forward rotation

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Figure 13

Model of relative amount of axial belt movement on driving side for that on driven side

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Figure 14

Experimental and calculated results of transmission error in reverse rotation

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Figure 15

Calculated axial movement per pitch rotation of normal belt side face

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Figure 16

Relationship between axial belt tooth load and axial belt span load

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