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Research Papers

A Finite Element Model for Consideration of the Torsional Effect on the Bearing Contact of Gear Drives

[+] Author and Article Information
Ignacio Gonzalez-Perez1

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena (UPCT), Dr. Fleming s/n, Cartagena 30202, Spainignacio.gonzalez@upct.es

Victor Roda-Casanova

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena (UPCT), Dr. Fleming s/n, Cartagena 30202, Spainvictorroda@gmail.com

Alfonso Fuentes

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena (UPCT), Dr. Fleming s/n, Cartagena 30202, Spainalfonso.fuentes@upct.es

Francisco T. Sanchez-Marin

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Construction,  Universitat Jaume I (UJI), Avenida Vicent Sos Baynat s/n, Castellón 12071, Spainfrancisco.sanchez@emc.uji.es

Jose L. Iserte

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Construction,  Universitat Jaume I (UJI), Avenida Vicent Sos Baynat s/n, Castellón 12071, Spainjiserte@emc.uji.es

1

Corresponding author.

J. Mech. Des 134(7), 071007 (Jun 08, 2012) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006831 History: Received February 27, 2012; Accepted April 27, 2012; Published June 07, 2012; Online June 08, 2012

The finite element method is widely applied for the determination of contact and bending stresses in gear drives. It is based on the finite element model of the gear drive that is built by the discretization of the pinion and gear teeth and usually does not take into account the supporting components of the gears, as shafts, their bearings, or the gear case. Such components have an important influence in the formation of the bearing contact due to their deformations under load. Recently, some improved models have been proposed for finite element analysis of gear drives including their shafts. Those models have allowed shaft deflections to be taken into account for the investigation of formation of the bearing contact under load and its influence on bending and contact stresses. In this paper, an enhanced finite element model that takes into account not only the shaft deflections but also the torsional deformation of gear tooth surfaces due to torque transmission is proposed. Some numerical examples have been included.

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Physical model of a spur gear drive

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Figure 2

Illustrations of: (a) the volume of designed body, (b) auxiliary intermediate surfaces, (c) determination of nodes for the whole volume, and (d) discretization of the volume by finite elements

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Figure 3

Illustration of the shafts and the to-be-meshed three-tooth volumes of pinion and wheel

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Figure 4

Details of the boundary conditions between the pinion rim and the portion of the shaft under the pinion rim: (a) model where torsional deformation is allowed, and (b) model where torsional deformation is not allowed

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Figure 5

Shaft and gear sections considered for the beam elements

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Figure 6

Variation of the load intensity (F/b) along the face width

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Figure 7

Formation of the bearing contact in cases: (a) 1a, (b) 2a, (c) 1b, and (d) 2b

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Figure 8

Load intensity functions (F/b)(z) for cases 1a, 2a, 1b, and 2b

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Figure 9

Physical model of a spur gear drive when the power path is different to the one shown in Fig. 1

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Figure 10

Load intensity functions (F/b)(z) in cases 1a and 3a, 1b and 3b, 2a and 4a, 2b and 4b

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Figure 11

Load intensity functions (F/b)(z) in cases 1a, 1b, 5a, 5b, 6a, and 6b (see Table 3)

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Figure 12

Load intensity functions (F/b)(z) in cases 1a, 1b, 7a, 7b, 8a, and 8b (see Table 4)

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Figure 13

Load intensity functions (F/b)(z) in cases 9a and 9b

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Figure 14

Formation of the bearing contact on the three-tooth model of a pinion for case of design 1a at the contact position number 8

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Figure 15

Evolution of maximum contact pressures at the three teeth of a pinion model during the cycle of meshing for cases of design 1a and 1b

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Figure 16

Evolution of maximum bending stress at the middle tooth of a pinion model during the cycle of meshing for cases of design 1a and 1b

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