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Research Papers

A Fatigue Model for Spur Gear Contacts Operating Under Mixed Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication Conditions

[+] Author and Article Information
S. Li1

The Gear and Power Transmission Research Laboratory,Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,  The Ohio State University, 201 West 19th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210li.600@osu.edu

A. Kahraman

The Gear and Power Transmission Research Laboratory,Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,  The Ohio State University, 201 West 19th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210kahraman.1@osu.edu

M. Klein

The Gear and Power Transmission Research Laboratory,Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,  The Ohio State University, 201 West 19th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210klein.313@osu.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Mech. Des 134(4), 041007 (Mar 19, 2012) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005655 History: Received June 19, 2011; Revised November 12, 2011; Published March 15, 2012; Online March 19, 2012

This paper presents a model to predict the crack formation fatigue lives of spur gear contacts operating under mixed lubrication conditions where surface roughnesses introduce intermittent metal-to-metal contacts and severe stress concentrations. The proposed model consists of several submodels, including (i) a gear load distribution model to determine the normal tooth force distribution along the tooth surface, incorporating any profile modifications and manufacturing deviations, (ii) a mixed elastohydrodynamic lubrication model customized to handle transient contact conditions of gears, (iii) a stress formulation that assumes the plane strain condition to compute the transient elastic stress fields on and below the tooth surface induced by the mixed lubrication surface pressure and shear stress distributions, and (iv) a multi-axial fatigue model to predict the crack nucleation life distribution. The proposed spur gear fatigue model is used to simulate the contacts of gear pairs having different surface roughness amplitudes. The predictions are compared to the measured gear fatigue stress-life data for each surface condition to assess the model accuracy in the prediction of the crack nucleation fatigue lives as well as the location of the critical failure sites.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Flowchart of the gear contact fatigue methodology

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Figure 2

Basic geometric parameters of an involute spur gear pair

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Figure 3

Computational domain and grid mesh used in this study

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Figure 4

Measured example surface roughness profiles for (a) shaved gear surfaces and (b) superfinished gear surfaces

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Figure 5

Pitting failure images for shaved gear pairs (left column) and superfinished gear pairs (right column) under the loading levels of (a) and (c) p̂p=1.71 and (b) and (d) p̂p=1.50

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Figure 6

Surface images of an example superfinished pinion at the contact cycles of (a) 0, (b) 18.4 × 106 , (c) 36.7 × 106 , (d) 55.1 × 106 , (e) 64.2 × 106 , and (f) 82.6 × 106 for p̂p=1.34.

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Figure 7

Central tooth force density distribution along the pinion roll angle at p̂p=1.50

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Figure 8

Predicted instantaneous (a) p(x,t) (solid line) and h(x,t) (dashed line), (b) q(x,t), (c) σx, (d) σz, and (e) σxz distributions at the LPSTC for shaved gears at p̂p=1.50

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Figure 9

Predicted instantaneous (a) p(x,t) (solid line) and h(x,t) (dashed line), (b) q(x,t), (c) σx, (d) σz, and (e) σxz distributions at the pitch point for shaved gears at p̂p=1.50

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Figure 10

Predicted instantaneous (a) p(x,t) (solid line) and h(x,t) (dashed line), (b) q(x,t), (c) σx, (d) σz, and (e) σxz distributions at the HPSTC for shaved gears at p̂p=1.50

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Figure 11

Predicted (a) lower 10th percentile life, (b) median life, and (c) upper 10th percentile life distributions at p̂p=1.50 for shaved gears. (a1-c1) Critical plane approach predictions and (a2-c2) characteristic plane approach predictions.

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Figure 12

Predicted (a) lower 10th percentile life, (b) median life, and (c) upper 10th percentile life distributions at p̂p=1.50 for superfinished gears. (a1-c1) Critical plane approach predictions and (a2-c2) characteristic plane approach predictions.

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Figure 13

Comparisons of the pitting lives between the model prediction using the characteristic plane approach and the experimental measurements for (a) shaved gear pairs and (b) superfinished gear pairs

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