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Research Papers

An Automated Design Method for Active Trailer Steering Systems of Articulated Heavy Vehicles

[+] Author and Article Information
Yuping He1

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science,  University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, ON, L1H 7K4, Canadayuping.he@uoit.ca

Md. Manjurul Islam

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science,  University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, ON, L1H 7K4, CanadaMdManjurul.Islam@uoit.ca

1

Corresponding author.

J. Mech. Des 134(4), 041002 (Mar 06, 2012) (15 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006047 History: Received August 03, 2010; Revised November 23, 2011; Published March 06, 2012; Online March 06, 2012

An important design decision for active trailer steering (ATS) systems for articulated heavy vehicles (AHVs) is the trade-off between maneuverability and lateral stability. This paper presents an automated design method for this trade-off. The proposed method has the following features: (1) a design framework for bilevel optimization of ATS systems is formulated; (2) design variables of ATS controllers and trailers are optimized simultaneously; (3) two controllers are designed for the ATS system for improving stability and enhancing maneuverability, respectively; and (4) a driver model is introduced in the virtual vehicle simulation for closed-loop testing maneuvers. The design framework allows automation of vehicle modeling, controller construction, performance evaluation, and design variable selection, and all required design processes are implemented in a single loop. The proposed method is compared to a previously published two-loop design method, showing that the new approach can effectively identify desired variables and predict performance envelopes.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic diagram showing the degrees-of-freedom and system parameters for the vehicle model

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Figure 2

Geometric representation of the vehicle and prescribed path

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Figure 3

Simulated trajectory of the center of the truck’s front axle during the high-speed single lane-change maneuver

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Figure 4

Simulated trajectory of the center of the truck’s front axle during the low-speed 360 deg roundabout maneuver

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Figure 5

Schematic representation of the SDL design method

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Figure 6

Schematic representation of the computer implementation of the SDL design method

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Figure 7

Diagrammatic representation of the scaling functions: (a) μ̃RWA(XSYS,XRWA) for the RWA ratio; (b) μ̃PFOT(XSYS,XPFOT) for the PFOT value

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Figure 8

Lateral acceleration at the truck and trailer’s CG versus time (results achieved in the simulated high-speed single lane-change test maneuver): (a) the baseline design case; (b) the SDL design case

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Figure 9

Trajectory of the center of the truck’s front axle and that of the center of the trailer’s rear axle (results achieved in the simulated high-speed single lane-change test maneuver): (a) the baseline design case; (b) the SDL design case

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Figure 10

Trajectory of the center of the truck’s front axle and that of the center of the trailer’s rear axle (results achieved in the simulated low-speed 360 deg roundabout test maneuver): (a) the baseline design case; (b) the SDL design case

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Figure 11

ATS system power consumption versus time for the SDL design during the low-speed 360 deg roundabout test maneuver

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Figure 12

Sensitivity of the RWA ratio to the variations of the trailer mass, mass moment of inertia, and front and rear axle tire cornering stiffness

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Figure 13

Relationship between the RWA ratio for the high-speed lane change and the PFOT value for 360 deg roundabout path-following: (a) the SDL design case; (b) the TDL design case

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Figure 14

Relationship between the RWA ratio for the high-speed lane change and the PFOT value for 90 deg intersection turn: (a) the SDL design case; (b) the TDL design case

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