0
Research Papers

Analysis and Design of One Degree of Freedom Worm Robots for Locomotion on Rigid and Compliant Terrain

[+] Author and Article Information
David Zarrouk

Robotics Laboratory,Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Technion– Israel Institute of Technology,Haifa, Israel, 32000zadavid@tx.technion.ac.il

Moshe Shoham

Robotics Laboratory,Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Technion– Israel Institute of Technology,Haifa, Israel, 32000shoham@technion.ac.il

J. Mech. Des. 134(2), 021010 (Feb 03, 2012) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005656 History: Received January 04, 2011; Revised January 03, 2012; Published February 03, 2012

Worm-like robots for applications including maintenance of small pipes and medical procedures in biological vessels such as the intestines, urethra, and blood vessels, have been the focus of many studies in the last few decades. The robots must be small, reliable, energy efficient, and capable of carrying cargos such as cameras, biosensors, and drugs. In this study, worm locomotion along rigid and compliant terrain is analyzed, and a novel design of worm-like multicell robots actuated by a single motor is presented. The robots employ a screw-like axis for sequencing and coordination of the cells and clamps. This design allows for significant miniaturization and reduces complexity and cost. The design of the robots and analysis of their dynamics and power efficiency are described. Two earthworm and two inchworm prototypes were built to demonstrate their performance. The robots are capable of moving forward, backward, and vertically and consume low power, which allow them to climb for hundreds of meters using onboard batteries.

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: Robots , Design , Friction
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Schematic presentation of earthworm-like locomotion

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

The position of the different robot cells, relative to their environment, as a function of time

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Position of each cell relative to the fourth cell, as a function of time

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

(a) The relative position of the cells engraved on a shaft, (b) isometric view, (c) exploded view of the robot

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Schematic presentation of inchworm locomotion

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Relative position (in black) of the cells and clamping modes (gray for clamping, light gray for unclamping)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

(a) The relative position of the cells and clamping modes is engraved on the shaft of the inchworm robot. (b) Isometric view of the shaft, (c) inchworm design, and (d) miniature inchworm design.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

The friction and the external forces acting on the robot when crawling. Arrows under the cells show the direction of the friction forces.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

The deflections underneath a cell before (δ1 ) and after locomotion (δmax ) reduce the effective advance (Ls -r -|δ1 | − |δmax |)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Locomotion efficiency as a function of compliance

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Locomotion efficiency as a function of the friction coefficient

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Left, prototype worm robot climbing in a transparent tube canal. Right, the cells with the passive interfaces of the robot

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

The position of the earthworm robot over time, when crawling on a rigid surface

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

The filtered current consumption during locomotion

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

Comparison between theoretical versus experimental “raising moment.” Experimental in gray, theoretical in dark gray

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 16

A robot with bending capabilities capable of moving along curvatures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 17

Inchworm (two-cell) prototype

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 18

A miniature 1DOF robot capable of moving forward, backward, and vertically at 10.5 mm/s

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 19

Miniature inchworm robot crawling inside a transparent tube

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 20

Motor mechanical and electrical characteristics as provided by the manufacturer

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In