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Research Papers

A Note on Flow Regimes and Churning Loss Modeling

[+] Author and Article Information
C. Changenet1

Laboratoire d’Energétique,  Université de Lyon, ECAM 69321 Lyon Cedex 05, FranceChristophe.Changenet@ecam.fr

G. Leprince

Laboratoire d’Energétique,  Université de Lyon, ECAM 69321 Lyon Cedex 05, France; Université de Lyon, INSA de Lyon, LaMCoS, UMR CNRS 5259, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex, FranceGauthier.Leprince@gmail.com

F. Ville

 Université de Lyon, INSA de Lyon, LaMCoS, UMR CNRS 5259, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex, FranceFabrice.Ville@insa-lyon.fr

P. Velex1

 Université de Lyon, INSA de Lyon, LaMCoS, UMR CNRS 5259, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex, FrancePhilippe.Velex@insa-lyon.fr

1

Corresponding author.

J. Mech. Des 133(12), 121009 (Dec 09, 2011) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005330 History: Received May 09, 2011; Revised September 30, 2011; Published December 09, 2011; Online December 09, 2011

The purpose of this study is to investigate the various fluid flow regimes generated by a pinion running partly immersed in an oil bath and the corresponding churning power losses. In a series of papers, the authors have established several loss formulae whose validity depends on two different flow regimes characterized via a critical Reynolds number. Based on some new measurements for transient operating conditions, it has been found that the separation in two regimes may be not accurate enough for wide-faced gears and high temperatures. An extended formulation is therefore proposed which, apart from viscous forces, introduces the influence of centrifugal effects. The corresponding results agree well with the experimental measurements from a number of gears and operating conditions (speed and temperature). Finally, the link between churning and windage losses is examined and it is concluded that the physical mechanisms are different thus making it difficult to establish a general correlation between the two phenomena. In particular, it is shown that tooth geometry is of secondary importance on churning whereas, the air-lubricant circulation being different for spur and helical gears, it substantially impacts windage.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 6

Comparisons between the model predictions and the experimental measurements for helical gear 7

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Figure 7

Comparisons between the model predictions and the experimental measurements for helical gear 8

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Figure 8

Churning losses for a disk

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Figure 9

Churning losses for different rotational speed values

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Figure 10

Lubricant aeration for gear 4

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Figure 5

Geometrical data of the gear immersed surface

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Figure 4

Churning losses at 4000 rpm versus oil temperature

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Figure 3

Influence of rotational speed on dimensionless drag torque

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Figure 2

Churning losses at 1000 rpm versus oil temperature

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