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Technical Briefs

Tooling System Design for Forming Aluminum Beverage Can End Shells

[+] Author and Article Information
Koetsu Yamazaki

Graduate School of Natural Science & Technology,  Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192, Japanyamazaki@se.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

Jing Han

 Universal Can Corporation, 1500 Suganuma, Oyama-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka 410-1392, Japanhanjing@mmc.co.jp

Takayasu Otsuka

 Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192, Japanotuka@stu.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

Takashi Hasegawa

Sadao Nishiyama

 Universal Can Corporation, 1500 Suganuma, Oyama-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka 410-1392, Japannisiyama@mmc.co.jp

J. Mech. Des 133(11), 114502 (Nov 11, 2011) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005103 History: Received January 14, 2011; Revised September 02, 2011; Published November 11, 2011; Online November 11, 2011

This paper proposes a new tooling system and performs an optimum design on it to minimize the amount of thinning during a forming process of aluminum beverage can end shells. Numerical simulations of the shell forming process and structural performance of the shell under internal pressure have been performed. Influences of the upmost surface profiles and initial positions of the tool in the new tooling system on the shell forming quality have been investigated, and a structural optimization method based on the numerical simulations has been then applied to find optimum design points subject to constraints of the shell geometrical dimensions. A comparison shows that thinning of the shell formed by the proposed new tooling system can be reduced approximately 3.6% compared to a conventional tooling system. Optimization results of the new tooling system show that the amount of thinning can be reduced almost 4%. It is also confirmed that the buckle pressure resistance of the shell is improved 5.5%. The new tooling system may reduce the amount of thinning; hence, may improve the structural performance of the can and may save metal.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Photographs of two-piece aluminum beverage cans

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Figure 2

Cross-section of shell

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Figure 3

Conventional tooling system (CTS)

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Figure 4

Forming process of Model CTS

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Figure 5

Thickness reduction distribution of Model CTS

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Figure 7

Forming process of Model NTS

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Figure 8

Thickness distribution of Model NTS

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Figure 9

Influences on forming quality

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Figure 10

Numerical simulation results of each design point

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Figure 11

Thickness distribution of optimum design Model NTO

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Figure 12

Forming process simulation of optimum design Model NTO

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Figure 13

Buckling strength analysis

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