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Research Papers

A Posteriori Design Change Analysis for Complex Engineering Projects

[+] Author and Article Information
Afreen Siddiqi

 Massachusetts Institute of Technology, E40-261, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139siddiqi@mit.edu

Gergana Bounova

 Massachusetts Institute of Technology, E40-261, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139gergana@mit.edu

Olivier L. de Weck

 Massachusetts Institute of Technology, E40-261, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139deweck@mit.edu

Rene Keller

 Concept Development Engineering, BP ICBT, Bldg 200, Chertsey Road, Sunbury on Thames, Middlesex TW16 7BP, UKRene.Keller@uk.bp.com

Bob Robinson

 Concept Development Engineering, BP ICBT, Bldg 200, Chertsey Road, Sunbury on Thames, Middlesex TW16 7BP, UKBob.Robinson@uk.bp.com

J. Mech. Des 133(10), 101005 (Oct 18, 2011) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004379 History: Received June 22, 2010; Revised April 12, 2011; Published October 18, 2011; Online October 18, 2011

Engineering changes are an inherent part of the design and development process and can play an important role in driving the overall success of the system. This work seeks to create a multidimensional understanding of change activity in large systems that can help in improving future design and development efforts. This is achieved by a posteriori analysis of design changes. It is proposed that by constructing a temporal, spatial, and financial view of change activity within and across these dimensions, it becomes possible to gain useful insights regarding the system of study. Engineering change data from the design and development of a multiyear, multibillion dollar development project of an offshore oil and gas production system is used as a case study in this work. It is shown that the results from such an analysis can be used for identifying better design and management strategies (in similar systems and projects) and for targeting design improvement in identified subsystems. The isolation and identification of change hotspots can be helpful in uncovering potential systemic design issues that may be prevalent. Similarly, strategic engineering and management decisions can be made if the major cost drivers are known.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

An object-process diagram of design change

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Figure 2

(a) Dimensions of engineering change and (b) engineering design change analysis process

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Figure 3

FPSO vessel in Angola, Africa [19]

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Figure 4

Monthly change generation activity

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Figure 5

Change effort and system behavior [12]

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Figure 6

Monthly DCN rejection ratio

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Figure 7

Number of DCNs per discipline

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Figure 8

Change acceptance index per discipline

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Figure 9

Number of DCNs based on cost type

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Figure 10

Cost increase and reduction distributions

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Figure 11

Cost estimation comparison

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Figure 12

Cumulative net cost over time

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Figure 13

Mean and median DCN cost per year

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Figure 14

DCN cost type per discipline

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Figure 15

DCN cost per discipline

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Figure 16

Variation of DCN cost by discipline

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Figure 17

Mean and median DCN cost per year

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