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Technical Briefs

Reversibility of Power-Split Transmissions

[+] Author and Article Information
F. Bottiglione1

G. Mantriota

Department of Environmental Engineering and Sustainable Development, Politecnico di Bari, Taranto (TA), Via A. De Gasperi s/n, 74100 Taranto, Italymantriota@poliba.it

1

Corresponding author.

J. Mech. Des 133(8), 084503 (Sep 01, 2011) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004586 History: Received February 03, 2011; Accepted July 03, 2011; Published September 01, 2011; Online September 01, 2011

Recent applications of continuously variable transmissions with large ratio spread, such as mechanical Kinetic Energy Recovery Systems or recent hybrid architectures, need the transmission to be perfectly reversible. This short paper deals with the mechanical efficiency of power-split continuously variable transmissions with particular emphasis on the switching from forward to reverse power flow. Forward and reverse transmission efficiency are calculated and compared, and the conditions which make it impossible to switch to reverse mode are studied. In particular, it is suggested that, although less efficient at high transmission ratios, a forward power circulation should be preferred because it has almost the same efficiency in forward and reverse operation.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: Flow (Dynamics)
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic picture of the output and input split arrangements. CVT is the continuously variable transmission, FR is the fixed ratio transmission, and PG is the planetary gear. The large arrows show the direction of the main power flow.

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Figure 2

Schematic picture of the internal power circulation of type I in an output split PS-CVT with a forward power transmission

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Figure 3

Schematic picture of the internal power circulation of type I in an output split PS-CVT with a reverse power transmission

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Figure 4

Schematic picture of the internal power circulation of type II in an output split PS-CVT with a forward power transmission

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Figure 5

Schematic picture of the internal power circulation of type II in an output split PS-CVT with a reverse power transmission

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Figure 6

The ratio rη as a function of the τPS for a PS-CVT with a type I power circulation

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Figure 7

The ratio rη as a function of the τPS for a PS-CVT with a type II power circulation

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Figure 8

The efficiency of the PS-CVT with a power flow of type I. The gray line is the ηCVT , which is supposed to be constant, the black continuous line is the ηPS in forward main power flow, and the dashed line is the ηPS in reverse main power flow. Lower and upper bounds of τPS are also emphasized.

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Figure 9

The efficiency of the PS-CVT with a power flow of type II. The gray line is the ηCVT , which is supposed to be constant, the black continuous line is the ηPS in forward main power flow, and the dashed line is the ηPS in reverse main power flow. Lower and upper bounds of τPS are also emphasized.

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