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Research Papers

Incorporating Moldability Considerations During the Design of Polymer Heat Exchangers

[+] Author and Article Information
Juan Cevallos

S. K. Gupta1

Avram Bar-Cohen

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742abc@umd.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Mech. Des 133(8), 081009 (Aug 22, 2011) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004583 History: Received October 29, 2009; Revised June 28, 2011; Published August 22, 2011; Online August 22, 2011

Recently, available formulations of thermally enhanced polymer composites are attractive in heat exchanger applications due to their low cost and improved corrosion resistance compared to the conventional metal options. This paper presents a systematic approach to the design of plate-fin heat exchangers made out of thermally enhanced polymer composites. We have formulated the design problem as the life cycle cost minimization problem. The integrated design model introduced here accounts for heat transfer performance, molding cost, and assembly costs. We have adopted well-known models to develop individual parametric models that describe how heat transfer performance, molding cost, and assembly cost varies as a function of the geometric parameters of the heat exchanger. Thermally enhanced polymer composites behave differently from the conventional polymers during the molding process. The desired thin walled large structures are expected to pose challenges during the filling phase of the molding process. Hence, we have utilized experimentally validated simulations to develop a metamodel to identify difficult and impossible to mold design configurations. This metamodel has been integrated within the overall formulation to address the manufacturability considerations. This paper also presents several case studies that show how the material and labor cost strongly influence the final design.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Seawater-methane heat exchanger module

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Figure 2

Square finned plate

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Figure 3

Finned plate cost as a function of: (a) base length L (tb  = 2 mm, S = 10 mm, t = 2 mm), (b) base thickness tb (L = 500 mm, S = 10 mm, t = 2mm), (c) fin spacing S (L = 500 mm, tb  = 2 mm, t = 2 mm), (d) fin thickness t (L = 500 mm, tb  = 2 mm, S = 10 mm); Production qty. = 10,000 parts, Material = $22/kg

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Figure 4

Behavior of feasible boundary (mold fill % = 90) as a function of three of the design variables

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Figure 5

HX Cost along feasible boundary (φ = 90%, S = 3 mm, L = {L|200≤L≤1000 and φ = 90%}, material: $22/kg, assembly: 60/h)

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Figure 6

HX Cost along feasible boundary (φ = 90%, S = 3 mm, L = {L|200≤L≤1000 and φ = 90%}, material: $44/kg, assembly: 60/h)

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Figure 7

HX Cost along feasible boundary (φ = 90%, S = 3 mm, L = {L|200≤L≤1000 and φ = 90%}, material: $22/kg, assembly: 120/h)

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