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Research Papers

Experimental Investigation of Chain Link Forces in Continuously Variable Transmissions

[+] Author and Article Information
L. De Novellis

Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Gestionale, Politecnico di Bari, v.le Japigia 182, 70126 Bari, Italyl.denovellis@poliba.it

G. Carbone

Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Gestionale, Politecnico di Bari, v.le Japigia 182, 70126 Bari, Italyg.carbone@poliba.it

J. Mech. Des 132(12), 121004 (Nov 23, 2010) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002764 History: Received March 25, 2010; Revised October 06, 2010; Published November 23, 2010; Online November 23, 2010

This paper deals with the experimental analysis of link tension distribution in a chain type continuously variable transmission. We have developed an ad hoc measuring device constituted by a data-logger that is fixed at the chain and moves with it. The data-logger records the strain data from a strain gauge and stores them in a flash memory card. We have been able to measure the tensile force acting on a single chain link in a wide range of working conditions. Our measurements have shown that an almost perfect linearity (which has a clear theoretical explanation) exists between the clamping force and the link tension distribution. We have also found that the link tension distribution is less sensitive to the torque load, which mainly influences the local slip between the chain and the pulley and hence the time required by the link to cover the entire contact arc. We have also carried out a comparison between theoretical predictions and experimental data. We have found a relatively good agreement that confirms the validity of the theoretical approach.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

(a) A schematic and (b) a photograph of the GCI chain made of pins, strip, and links properly connected. Only the pins touch the surface of the pulley sheaves and transmit normal and frictional force.

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Figure 2

The scheme of the data-logging setup

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Figure 3

The electronic control unit and the battery of the data-logging device

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Figure 4

The calibration curves (voltage versus load) of the gauged link (loading in blue color, unloading in red color in online version of this article) for a 24 mm chain link

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Figure 5

Some photographs of the GCI chain sample (a) with the modified links, (b) assembled with a strain gauge, (c) equipped with the data-logger and the battery, and (d) the chain mounted on the P811 variator

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Figure 6

The link tensile force distribution F as a function of the time t measured during one revolution at τid=0.41 and ωDR=27 rpm at TDN=6 Nm, SDR=12 kN (blue curve in online version of this article), and SDR=24 kN (red curve in online version of this article).

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Figure 7

The link tensile force distribution F as a function of the time t measured during one revolution at τid=0.41 and ωDR=27 rpm for TDN=6 Nm and SDR=24 kN (blue curve in online version of this article) and TDN=40 Nm and SDR=24 kN (red curve in online version of this article).

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Figure 8

The link tensile force distribution F as a function of the time t measured during one revolution at τid=1 and ωDR=27 rpm for different values of secondary torque and primary clamping force: TDN=20 Nm, SDR=12 kN (blue curve in online verison of this article), TDN=20 Nm, SDR=24 kN (red curve in online version of this article) in (a); TDN=70 Nm, SDR=12 kN (blue curve in online verison of this article), TDN=70 Nm, SDR=24 kN (red curve in online version of this article) in (b)

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Figure 9

The link tensile force distribution F as a function of the time t measured during one revolution at τid=1.8 and ωDR=27 rpm for different values of secondary torque and primary clamping force: TDN=8 Nm, SDR=12 kN (blue curve in online version of this article), TDN=8 Nm, SDR=24 kN (red curve in online version of this article) in (a); TDN=40 Nm, SDR=12 kN (blue curve in online version of this article), TDN=40 Nm, SDR=24 kN (red curve in online version of this article) in (b)

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Figure 10

(a) The effect of misalignment δ on the bending moment of the chain along the free strands and (b) the configuration of the two strain gauges on the GCI chain

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Figure 11

The link tensile force distribution F as a function of the time t measured during one revolution at τid=1 and ωDR=27 rpm at TDN=20 Nm and SDR=24 kN evaluated as the mean value of the tensile force measured on both sides of the chain link pattern

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Figure 12

The beam-like FEM model utilized to determine the distribution of link forces among the links

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Figure 13

The link tensile force distribution. Measured data (reported in blue color in online version of this article) represent the mean value of the tensile load acting on the two opposite edges of a chain pattern, and theoretical predictions are in red color in online version of this article. Data are shown for speed ratio τid=1, SDR=24 kN, and torque load TDN=20 Nm.

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Figure 14

The link tensile force distribution. Measured data are reported in blue color and theoretical prediction in red color in online version of this article. Data are shown for speed ratio τid=1, SDR=12 kN, and two values of the torque load (a) TDN=20 Nm and (b) TDN=70 Nm.

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Figure 15

The link tensile force distribution. Measured data are reported in blue color, and theoretical prediction are in red color in online version of this article. Data are shown for speed ratio τid=1, SDR=24 kN, and torque load TDN=70 Nm.

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Figure 16

The ratio εtot/ε0 as a function of the dimensionless axial coordinate Z. Calculation have been performed for two different lengths of the pin l=24 mm and 30 mm. In accordance with the chain and pulley geometrical data, we have assumed h/[r0J′(θ)]=4.5×108 m−4.

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