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Research Papers

Checklist-Based Assessment Methodology for Sustainable Design

[+] Author and Article Information
Yusuke Kishita1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 5650871, Japankishita@lce.mech.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

Bi Hong Low

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 5650871, Japanlow@lce.mech.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

Shinichi Fukushige

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 5650871, Japanfukushige@mech.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

Yasushi Umeda

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 5650871, Japanumeda@mech.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

Atsushi Suzuki

Research and Development Center, Riso Kagaku Corporation, Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki 3001156, Japansuzu@riso.co.jp

Takao Kawabe

Research and Development Center, Riso Kagaku Corporation, Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki 3001156, Japankawabe@riso.co.jp

1

Corresponding author.

J. Mech. Des 132(9), 091011 (Sep 17, 2010) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002130 History: Received December 29, 2009; Revised July 04, 2010; Published September 17, 2010; Online September 17, 2010

The manufacturing industry is faced with a challenge to create products with less environmental impact targeting a sustainable society. To cope with this challenge, sustainable design or ecodesign plays one of the most important roles. Manufacturers often use ecodesign checklists that are intended for obtaining eco-labels, such as Eco Mark in Japan, in order to support design improvements of products in terms of environmental consciousness. Eco-label checklists are, however, insufficient to support designing products rationally because the relationships between individual requirements of checklists and environmental impact are undetermined. This paper proposes a method for supporting assessment for ecodesign by developing a weighted checklist from a conventional eco-label checklist. This weighted checklist assesses the environmental performance of a product based on the potential environmental improvement of each requirement, derived by life cycle simulation. Results of a case study involving a digital duplicator indicate that the proposed method successfully clarifies the requirements that should be improved in the present product. When the design improvements are applied, the assessment of the product’s CO2 emissions shows an improvement by 8%.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: Green design , Design , Cycles
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Estimation of CO2 difference

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Figure 2

System architecture

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Figure 3

Life cycle flow of the digital duplicator

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Figure 4

Part of the weighted checklist developed in the system

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