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Research Papers

Integrating Life Cycle Assessment Into the Conceptual Phase of Design Using a Design Repository

[+] Author and Article Information
Matt R. Bohm

 J.B. Speed School of Engineering, 200 Sackett Hall, Louisville, KY 40292matt.bohm@louisville.edu

Karl R. Haapala

 School of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, 204 Rogers Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331karl.haapala@oregonstate.edu

Kerry Poppa

 School of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, 204 Rogers Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331kpoppa@designengineeringlab.org

Robert B. Stone

 School of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, 204 Rogers Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331rob.stone@oregonstate.edu

Irem Y. Tumer

 School of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, 204 Rogers Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331irem.tumer@oregonstate.edu

Available at http://designengineeringlab.org/repositoryEntry

J. Mech. Des 132(9), 091005 (Sep 16, 2010) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002152 History: Received January 15, 2010; Revised July 06, 2010; Published September 16, 2010; Online September 16, 2010

This paper describes efforts taken to further transition life cycle assessment techniques from the latter, more detailed phases of design to the early-on conceptual phase of product development. By using modern design methodologies such as automated concept generation and an archive of product design knowledge, known as the Design Repository, virtual concepts are created and specified. Streamlined life cycle assessment techniques are then used to determine the environmental impacts of the virtual concepts. As a means to benchmark the virtual results, analogous real-life products that have functional and component similarities are identified. The identified products are then scrutinized to determine their material composition and manufacturing attributes in order to perform an additional round of life cycle assessment for the actual products. The results of this research show that sufficient information exists within the conceptual phase of design (utilizing the Design Repository) to reasonably predict the relative environmental impacts of actual products based on virtual concepts.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

The product life cycle

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Figure 2

Input functional model for concept generation

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Figure 3

Exploded view of toaster components

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Figure 4

Environmental impacts (Eco-indicator 99 E/E method)

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Figure 5

Environmental impacts (Eco-indicator 99 I/A method)

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Figure 6

Environmental impact categories (Eco-indicator 99 E/E method)

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Figure 7

End point Impacts (ReCiPe 2008 World H/A method)

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Figure 9

Predicted impacts for toaster alternatives (ReCiPe 2008 World H/A method)

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