0
Research Papers

A Device for Harvesting Energy From Rotational Vibrations

[+] Author and Article Information
A Zachary Trimble

Precision Engineering Research Group (PERG), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139atrimble@mit.edu

Jeffrey H. Lang

Laboratory for Electromagnetic and Electronic Systems (LEES), Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139lang@mit.edu

Jahir Pabon

 Schlumberger Doll Research Center, Cambridge, MA 02139jahir@slb.com

Alexander Slocum

Precision Engineering Research Group (PERG), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139slocum@mit.edu

J. Mech. Des 132(9), 091001 (Aug 30, 2010) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002240 History: Received March 16, 2010; Revised July 27, 2010; Published August 30, 2010; Online August 30, 2010

A new device designed to harvest rotational vibration energy is presented. The device is modeled as a spring-mass-damper system connected to a vibration source where a torsion rod is used as a spring element and a shearing electromagnetic induction circuit as the energy harvesting element. The device is inherently a resonant type harvester. A prototype device is tested using a purely sinusoidal vibration input and more realistic inputs consisting of wider bandwidths, multiple resonance peaks, and low amplitude noise. The performance of the prototype to realistic inputs verifies the ongoing challenge to vibration energy harvesting, namely, significant loss of performance when using broadband inputs with resonant based devices.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Lumped parameter model of the harvester

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Cross-sectional view of the magnetic circuit (to scale)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Plot of the calculated radial flux density, Br, evaluated at roc. Although Br is an infinite summation, as can be seen, the influence of higher order terms is small and can be neglected.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

B field streamlines (single magnet pair)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Equivalent electromagnetic circuit model

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Solid model (exploded and cross section) of the prototype design: A, end caps/bearing supports; B, casing; C, rotor; D, magnets; E, torsion rod; F, torsion rod clamps; G, bearings; H, coil

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Verification of emf model (V=λ0ω sin(pωt+θ) and λ0=0.0073We)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Plot of the emf voltage versus time in open circuit operation for a single frequency input. As can be seen, the experimentally measured voltage is nearly identical to the predicted voltage.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Plot of the amplitude of emf voltage as a function of frequency for a single frequency input. Each of the “x’s” represent an independent experiment at the input frequency shown. As can be seen, the experimentally measured voltage coincides with the predicted voltage.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Example real-world signal the device is expected to produce energy from. Shown are the time and frequency decompositions of the desired signal and the actual signal. The input vibration was provided to the device without feedback control; however, as can be seen, the actual input signal is still representative of a wide-band vibration as commonly encountered.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Plot of the power versus frequency for a single frequency input at approximately the same amplitude as the example realistic signal shown in Fig. 1

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Plot of the voltage across a load resistor as a function of time for the real-world input shown in Fig. 1

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In