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Research Papers

Combining Dynamic Modeling With Geometric Constraint Management to Support Low Clearance Virtual Manual Assembly

[+] Author and Article Information
Abhishek Seth

Department of Applied Research, Product Development & Global Technology, Caterpillar Inc., Peoria, IL 61629seth_abhishek@cat.com

Judy M. Vance

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virtual Reality Applications Center, Iowa State University, 2274 Howe Hall, Room 1620, Ames, IA 50011jmvance@iastate.edu

James H. Oliver

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virtual Reality Applications Center, Iowa State University, 2274 Howe Hall, Room 1620, Ames, IA 50011oliver@iastate.edu

J. Mech. Des 132(8), 081002 (Jul 21, 2010) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001565 History: Received May 16, 2007; Revised March 24, 2010; Published July 21, 2010; Online July 21, 2010

This research presents a novel approach to virtual assembly that combines dynamic modeling with geometric constraint-based modeling to support low clearance manual assembly of CAD models. This is made possible by utilizing the boundary representation solid model data available in most contemporary CAD representations, which enables (a) accurate collision/physics calculations on exact model definitions, and (b) access to geometric features. Application of geometric constraints during run-time, aid the designer during assembly of the virtual models. The feasibility of the approach is demonstrated using a pin and hole assembly example. Results that demonstrate the method give the user the ability to assemble parts without requiring extensive CAD preprocessing and without over constraining the user to arrive at predetermined final part orientations. Assembly is successful with diametral clearance as low as 0.0001 mm, as measured between a 26 mm diameter hole and pin.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Assembly sequence of pin and hole: (a and b) step 1, (c and d) step 2, and (e and f) step 3

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Figure 2

(a) Voxel, (b) polygon, and (c) B-Rep representations of a part

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Figure 3

SHARP modular structure

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Figure 4

Application flowchart

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Figure 5

Assembly using collision detection only

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Figure 6

Assembly using geometric constraints

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Figure 7

Assembly using collision detection, dynamic modeling and geometric constraints: (a and b) step 1, (c and d) step 2, and (e and f) step 3

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