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Technical Briefs

The Effect of Configuration in the Design of Geared Transmission Systems

[+] Author and Article Information
A. V. Olver

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, UK

J. Mech. Des 131(7), 074504 (Jun 23, 2009) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3151801 History: Received September 21, 2008; Revised April 03, 2009; Published June 23, 2009

It has been widely observed that the mass (or weight) and cost of geared transmission systems is a relatively simple function of the maximum continuous torques to be transmitted. This fact may be used to derive simple design tools, which allow rapid comparison of the size and mass of a wide range of designs. Particularly influential is the effect of the configuration: the ratio, number, and disposition of the stages of gearing. In the present paper, a “configuration factor” is developed for the design of multistage, multiple layshaft gearboxes, based on a simplified mass comparison of gearsets designed for the same duty. The results are used to explore the effects of ratio-split, thin-rim designs, and layshaft numbers.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of a two-stage reduction gear train. The output wheel, shown in section, depicts the use of a thin-rimmed weight-saving design.

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Figure 2

A reduction gear train with two layshafts

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Figure 3

Thin-rimmed gear showing proportions of rim and tooth thickness

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Figure 7

Estimated gear weight for a multiple layshaft, two-stage, 20:1 transmission as a function of the number of layshafts, n. SH=1.2, SF=2.6, p0=1.3 GPa, σb=720 MPa, E∗=110 GPa, ρ=7800 kg m−3, z1=25, T=1000 N m, uS1=2, and uS2=10. Thin-rimmed wheel design.

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Figure 8

Comparison of static and dynamic (Eq. 21) design. Dynamic factors from Refs. 1,9 for two different effective pitch errors (see Appendix ) are compared.

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Figure 9

Gear with a disk-shaped web

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Figure 10

Constant shear stress and traditional webs

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Figure 4

Estimated gear weight for a single layshaft, two-stage, 20:1 transmission as a function of the output gear ratio, uS2. SH=1.2, SF=2.6, p0=1.3 GPa, σb=720 MPa, E∗=110 GPa, ρ=7800 kg m−3, z1=25, T=1000 N m, and n=1. Solid wheel design.

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Figure 5

Estimated gear weight for a multiple layshaft, two-stage, 20:1 transmission as a function of the number of layshafts, n. SH=1.2, SF=2.6, p0=1.3 GPa, σb=720 MPa, E∗=110 GPa, ρ=7800 kg m−3, z1=25, T=1000 N m, uS1=2, and uS2=10. Solid wheel design.

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Figure 6

Estimated gear weight for a single layshaft, two-stage, 20:1 transmission as a function of the output gear ratio, uS2. SH=1.2, SF=2.6, p0=1.3 GPa, σb=720 MPa, E∗=110 GPa, ρ=7800 kg m−3, z1=25, T=1000 N m, and n=1. Thin-rimmed wheel design.

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