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Research Papers

Factors Affecting Transmission Error in Helical Synchronous Belt With Error on Belt Side Face Under Bidirectional Operation

[+] Author and Article Information
Masanori Kagotani

Department of Mechanical Engineering for Transportation, Osaka Sangyo University, 3-1-1, Nakagaito, Daito-shi, Osaka 574-8530, Japankagotani@tm.osaka-sandai.ac.jp

Hiroyuki Ueda

Department of Mechanical Engineering for Transportation, Osaka Sangyo University, 3-1-1, Nakagaito, Daito-shi, Osaka 574-8530, Japanueda@tm.osaka-sandai.ac.jp

J. Mech. Des 132(7), 071005 (Jun 17, 2010) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001667 History: Received September 28, 2009; Revised April 07, 2010; Published June 17, 2010; Online June 17, 2010

Helical synchronous belt drives are effective for reducing the noise and transmission error per single pitch of a pulley, as compared with conventional synchronous belt drives. However, the helix angle of the tooth trace causes axial belt movement. When the belt comes into contact with the pulley flange or moves away from the pulley flange due to bidirectional operation, the accuracy of finishing on the belt side face affects the transmission error. In addition, various factors, such as the transmitted torque, installation tension, pitch difference between the belt and the pulley, and alignment error between the driving and driven pulleys in the axial direction, are considered to affect the behavior of the transmission error. In the present study, the influence of various factors on the transmission error in a helical synchronous belt with the error on the belt side face was investigated. Specifically, the case in which a flanged pulley is rotated in bidirectional operation under the quasi-static condition and transmitted torque was examined. The transmission error in bidirectional operation considering the error on the belt side face increased with an increase in the transmitted torque, but was reduced when the installation tension was set to be high and when the pitch difference on the driving side was smaller than that on the driven side. In addition, the accuracy of rotation transmission improved when the alignment between the pulleys in the axial direction was set so that the belt on the driving side came into contact with the pulley flange earlier than the belt on the driven side.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Dimensions of the test belts and pulleys

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Figure 2

Experimental apparatus for measuring the transmission error

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Figure 3

Method of applying the transmitted torque

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Figure 4

Principle for measuring the transmission error

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Figure 5

Method of measuring the axial belt movement by the axial force

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Figure 6

Error on the belt side face used in the experiment and calculation

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Figure 8

Experimental and calculated results for the transmission errors in bidirectional operation

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Figure 9

Position of error on the belt side face wound on the pulleys

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Figure 10

Influence of the transmitted torque on the transmission error in bidirectional operation

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Figure 11

Influence of the installation tension on the transmission error in bidirectional operation

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Figure 12

Influence of the pitch difference on the transmission error in bidirectional operation

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Figure 13

Influence of the pulley alignment error on the transmission error in bidirectional operation

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Figure 14

Motion of the belt wound on the pulleys with ya under bidirectional operation

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