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Research Papers

Analysis of General Characteristics of Transmission Error of Gears With Convex Modification of Tooth Flank Form Considering Elastic Deformation Under Load

[+] Author and Article Information
Edzrol Niza Mohamad, Hiroaki Murakami, Aizoh Kubo

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Kyoto University, Yoshidahonmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan

Masaharu Komori

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Kyoto University, Yoshidahonmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi, Kyoto 606-8501, Japankomorim@me.kyoto-u.ac.jp

Suping Fang

State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing System Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Chinafangsuping@hotmail.com

J. Mech. Des 131(6), 061015 (May 21, 2009) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3116261 History: Received March 30, 2008; Revised February 23, 2009; Published May 21, 2009

The vibration/noise of power transmission gears is a serious problem for vehicles including automobiles, and therefore many studies on gear vibration have been reported. These studies, however, were carried out by investigation using numerical simulations in which gears with specific dimensions and tooth flank modifications under specific loading were considered. Therefore, the general characteristics of the transmission error of gears have not been clarified theoretically. In this report, a general model for the tooth meshing of gears is proposed; in which a quasi-infinite elastic model composed of springs with stiffness peculiar to the gear is incorporated. The transmission error of gears is formulated by theoretical equations. An investigation on the factors affecting the general characteristics of transmission error is accomplished using the formulated equations. The qualitative characteristic of the transmission error of gears with convex tooth flank form deviation is determined by the actual contact ratio and qualitative elements of gears, i.e., tooth flank form deviation and the distribution of stiffness. Even if the amplitude of torque, the amount of tooth flank form deviation, and other quantitative elements are not determined, the qualitative characteristic of transmission error can be derived. The peak-to-peak value of transmission error increases proportionately to the amount of tooth flank form deviation.

Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Definition of length of actual contact pattern

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Figure 2

CTFFD, curve on contact line, ridge curve, and their extended part expressed on the plane of action of a helical gear

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Figure 3

Definition of ridge curve

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Figure 4

Effect of s on the form of ridge curve

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Figure 5

Definition of curve on contact line at position x

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Figure 6

Distribution of angle-distance conversion factor on the tooth flank of the sample hypoid gear

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Figure 7

Spring model used to express elastic deformation of the tooth pair in contact

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Figure 8

Relationship between actual contact length of contact line and unit stiffness under different loads investigated using the conventional simulation (x=0 denotes the contact line at the middle of the plane of action)

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Figure 9

Definition of functions of unit stiffness

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Figure 10

Sample of unit stiffness expressed using its representative, where the conditions in Fig. 8 are simulated

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Figure 11

Relationship among actual contact length lcl, deformation D, and deformed area S on the contact line

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Figure 12

Flow for calculating normalized transmission error by the general model

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Figure 13

Absolute amount of transmission error for helical gear calculated using general model

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Figure 14

Relationship between actual contact ratio and peak-to-peak value of transmission error for helical gear calculated using conventional simulation and general model

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Figure 15

Distribution of actual contact ratio corresponding to the maximum positions of peak-to-peak value of transmission error

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