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Research Papers: Power Transmissions and Gearing

Simulation of Hypoid Gear Lapping

[+] Author and Article Information
Qimi Jiang

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Laval University, Quebec City, QC, G1V 0A6 Canadaqimi_j@yahoo.com

Claude Gosselin

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Laval University, Quebec City, QC, G1V 0A6 Canadacgosselica@yahoo.ca

Jack Masseth

 American Axle and Manufacturing, 1840 Holbrook Avenue, Detroit, MI 48212jack.masseth@aam.com

J. Mech. Des 130(11), 112601 (Sep 25, 2008) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2976453 History: Received September 19, 2007; Revised May 28, 2008; Published September 25, 2008

In the lapping process of hypoid gears, a gear set is run at varying operating positions and under a light load in order to lap the complete tooth surface. Because of the rolling and sliding motion inherent to hypoid gears, the lapping compound acts as an abrasive and refines the tooth surface to achieve smoothness in rolling action and produce high quality gear sets. In this paper, the lapping process is reproduced using advanced modeling tools such as gear tooth vectorial simulation for the tooth surfaces and reverse engineering to analyze the tooth contact pattern of existing gear sets. Test gear sets are measured using a coordinate measurement machine prior to a special lapping cycle where the position of the gear sets on the lapper does not change, and then are remeasured after lapping in order to establish how much and where material was removed. A wear constant named “wear coefficient” specific to the lapping compound is then calculated. Based on the obtained wear coefficient value, an algorithm for simulating the lapping process is presented. Gear sets lapped on the production line at AAM are used for simulation case studies. Initial results show significant scattering of tooth distortion from tooth to tooth and from gear set to gear set, which makes the simulation process difficult. However, it is possible to predict a confidence range within which actual lapping should fall, thereby opening the door to the optimization of the lapping process.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: Wear , Grinding , Gears , Errors , Simulation
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Discretized contact region

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Figure 2

Contact pressure in one mesh

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Figure 3

The contact pattern before lapping—gear IB tooth flank (using the error surface)

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Figure 4

The contact pattern after lapping—gear IB tooth flank (using the error surface)

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Figure 5

The contact pattern—gear IB tooth flank (neglecting the error surface)

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Figure 6

Interpolation scheme for the contact pattern

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Figure 7

Error surface—P3: (a) predicted error surface after lapping, (b) measured error surface after lapping, and (c) difference betweem (a) and (b)

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Figure 8

Error surface—G3: (a) predicted error surface after lapping, (b) measured error surface after lapping, and (c) difference betweem (a) and (b)

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Figure 9

Error surface—P4: (a) predicted error surface after lapping, (b) measured error surface after lapping, and (c) difference betweem (a) and (b)

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Figure 10

Error surface—G4: (a) predicted error surface after lapping, (b) measured error surface after lapping, and (c) difference between (a) and (b)

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Figure 11

The contact patterns—P3G3: (a) using prelap measurements, (b) using lapping prediction, and (c) using postlap measurements

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Figure 12

The transmission error—P3: (a) using prelap measurements, (b) using lapping prediction, and (c) using postlap measurements

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