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Research Papers: Power Transmissions and Gearing

Design of Laser Interferometric Measuring Device of Involute Profile

[+] Author and Article Information
Fumi Takeoka, Aizoh Kubo, Hiroshige Fujio, Shigeaki Taniyama, Takehiro Ito

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Kyoto University, Yoshidahonmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan

Masaharu Komori

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Kyoto University, Yoshidahonmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi, Kyoto 606-8501, Japankomorim@me.kyoto-u.ac.jp

Toshiyuki Takatsuji

Dimensional Standards Section,  National Metrology Institute of Japan, AIST, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568, Japantoshiyuki.takatsuji@aist.go.jp

Sonko Osawa, Osamu Sato

Dimensional Standards Section,  National Metrology Institute of Japan, AIST, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568, Japan

J. Mech. Des 130(5), 052602 (Mar 26, 2008) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2890114 History: Received May 24, 2007; Revised December 19, 2007; Published March 26, 2008

The vibration and noise of gears is one of the serious problems for devices, such as vehicles and wind turbines. The characteristics of the vibration and noise of gears are considerably affected by the tooth flank form deviation of micrometer order. The quality of product gears is controlled using a gear measuring instrument and calibrated with an involute artifact. However, the conventional calibration of the involute artifact cannot achieve a sufficient accuracy. In this report, a direct method of measuring the involute artifact using a laser interferometer is proposed. Fundamental experiments are carried out, in which the effects of the surface condition of the measured object and the effect of the driving of the artifact are investigated. It is confirmed that the proposed method enables the measurement of the detailed form of an involute tooth flank and has the potential of accomplishing a highly precise measurement of an involute artifact.

Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Measurement principle of involute artifact

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Figure 2

Involute artifact with base cylinder

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Figure 3

Measured points of involute artifact

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Figure 4

Setup for involute measurement

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Figure 5

Optical configuration for interferometric measurement

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Figure 6

Pinhole gauges set for optical axis adjustment

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Figure 7

Measurement of cylinder and mirror using parallel laser beam

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Figure 8

Measurement of cylinder and mirror using focused laser beam

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Figure 9

Micrograph of tooth flank of involute artifact

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Figure 10

Measured profile deviation curve of involute artifact driven manually

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Figure 11

Motor driving system for involute artifact

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Figure 12

Profile deviation curve measured using motor driving system

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Figure 13

Profile deviation curves of ten measurements

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Figure 14

Result of discrete Fourier transformation of measured profile deviation curve

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Figure 15

Stress fluctuation in steel belt during measurement

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