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Research Papers: Design Automation

An Adaptive One-Factor-at-a-Time Method for Robust Parameter Design: Comparison With Crossed Arrays via Case Studies

[+] Author and Article Information
Daniel D. Frey1

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Systems Division, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139danfrey@mit.edu

Nandan Sudarsanam

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Systems Division, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139nandan@mit.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Mech. Des 130(2), 021401 (Dec 27, 2007) (14 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2748450 History: Received July 14, 2006; Revised November 23, 2006; Published December 27, 2007

This paper presents a conceptually simple and resource efficient method for robust parameter design. The proposed method varies control factors according to an adaptive one-factor-at-a-time plan while varying noise factors using a two-level resolution III fractional factorial array. This method is compared with crossed arrays by analyzing a set of four case studies to which both approaches were applied. The proposed method improves system robustness effectively, attaining more than 80% of the potential improvement on average if experimental error is low. This figure improves to about 90% if prior knowledge of the system is used to define a promising starting point for the search. The results vary across the case studies, but, in general, both the average amount of improvement and the consistency of the results are better than those provided by crossed arrays if experimental error is low or if the system contains some large interactions involving two or more control factors. This is true despite the fact that the proposed method generally uses fewer experiments than crossed arrays. The case studies reveal that the proposed method provides these benefits by exploiting, with high probability, both control by noise interactions and also higher order effects involving two control factors and a noise factor. The overall conclusion is that adaptive one-factor-at-a-time, used in concert with factorial outer arrays, is demonstrated to be an effective approach to robust parameter design providing significant practical advantages as compared to commonly used alternatives.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

A crossed array for robust design

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Figure 2

Adaptive one-factor-at-a-time for robust design

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Figure 3

Comparison of resource consumption in aOFAT and Resolution III crossed arrays using two-level factors

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Figure 4

A schematic diagram of the sheet metal spinning process (from (7))

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Figure 5

Results for three methods of robust design applied to the sheet metal spinning model

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Figure 6

Circuit diagram of the operational amplifier (from (21))

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Figure 7

Results for three methods of robust design applied to the operational amplifier simulation

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Figure 8

Template for the paper airplane scaled down from its original 8.5×11in. dimensions (from (22))

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Figure 9

Results for three methods of robust design applied to the paper airplane physical experiment

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Figure 10

System dynamics diagram of the freight transportation system (from (24))

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Figure 11

Results for three methods of robust design applied to the freight transportation system

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