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TECHNICAL BRIEFS

Design, Simulation, and Fabrication of a Quadstable Monolithic Mechanism With X- and Y-Directional Bistable Curved Beams

[+] Author and Article Information
Jeong Sam Han

School of Mechanical Engineering, Andong National University, 388 Songchon-dong, 760-749 Andong, Koreajshan@andong.ac.kr

Claas Müller

Institute for Microsystem Technology (IMTEK), University of Freiburg, Georges-Köhler-Allee 103, D-79110 Freiburg, Germanyclmuelle@imtek.de

Ulrike Wallrabe

Institute for Microsystem Technology (IMTEK), University of Freiburg, Georges-Köhler-Allee 103, D-79110 Freiburg, Germanywallrabe@imtek.de

Jan G. Korvink

Institute for Microsystem Technology (IMTEK), University of Freiburg, Georges-Köhler-Allee 103, D-79110 Freiburg, Germanykorvink@imtek.de

J. Mech. Des 129(11), 1198-1203 (Nov 20, 2006) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2771577 History: Received March 16, 2006; Revised November 20, 2006

This paper demonstrates a novel quadstable monolithic mechanism (QsMM), which provides four stable equilibrium positions within its planar operation range. The QsMM has been realized from the use of both X- and Y-directional bistable structures, which utilize curved snapping beams. Two pairs of curved beams were attached to an inner frame in both X and Y directions to present an independent bistable behavior in the directions. It was found out that the design of the inner frame is crucial for the quadstability and dynamic responses of the mechanism. A millimeter-scale brass mechanism was actually fabricated by ultraprecision milling to test the quadstability and the force-displacement behavior. The prototype clearly demonstrates four distinct stable positions in its millimeter-scale operation range. The design concept, finite element simulation, fabrication, and experimental measurement of the proposed multistable mechanism have been presented. The mechanical multistability of the proposed QsMM can be utilized for multiple switching and optical networking applications, yielding low power consumption operations.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Typical response of a bistable curved snapping beam

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Figure 2

Photograph of the proposed QsMM (70×80mm2). The curved snapping beams are 100μm in thickness.

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Figure 3

Quadstable positions of the inner stage: (a) binary expression of the positions, (b) position 0 (initial state), (c) position 1, (d) position 2, and (e) position 3

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Figure 4

Definition of the design variables. Their values in micrometers are x1=x11=500, x2=60,000, x3=x13=100, x4=x14=2000, x5=x15=2000, x6=x16=1500, x7=x17=2000, x8=34,000, x9=2000, x10=2000, x12=60,000, x18=20,000, x19=20,000, x20=2000, and x21=2000.

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Figure 5

The FE mesh. The number of beam elements in the mesh is 472. The beam elements are intentionally displayed as solids with the shape determined from the design variables for better understanding.

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Figure 6

Force-displacement response at the center of the inner stage for the mechanism: (a) X-directional movement and (b) Y-directional movement

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Figure 7

Transient dynamic response at the center of the inner stage for the brass prototype: (a) actuation to position 1, (b) actuation to position 2, and (c) actuation to position 3

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Figure 8

Photographs of the brass prototype QsMM at the four stable positions: (a) position 0 (initial state), (b) position 1, (c) position 2, and (d) position 3. The mechanism is pushed manually into the stable positions.

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Figure 9

(a) Force-displacement responses of the X-directional movement and (b) maximum deflections at the supporting point T in Fig. 5 with respect to the change of the width (x9) of the inner frame. The current value is underlined.

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