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RESEARCH PAPERS

Cumulative Clamp Load Loss Due to a Fully Reversed Cyclic Service Load Acting on an Initially Yielded Bolted Joint System

[+] Author and Article Information
Sayed A. Nassar

Fastening and Joining Research Institute, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Oakland University, Rochester, MI 48309nassar@oakland.edu

Payam H. Matin

Fastening and Joining Research Institute, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Oakland University, Rochester, MI 48309

J. Mech. Des 129(4), 421-433 (Apr 08, 2006) (13 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2429700 History: Received November 11, 2005; Revised April 08, 2006

The amount of clamp load loss due to a fully reversed cyclic service load is determined for a bolted assembly in which the fastener and the joint were both tightened initially beyond their respective proportional limits. The cyclic reversed load acts in a direction parallel to the bolt axis. During the first half of each cycle, the cyclic load acts as tensile separating force that increases the fastener tension further into the nonlinear range; it simultaneously reduces the joint clamping force. Thus, after the first one half of the cycle, the clamp load is reduced from its initial value due to the plastic elongation of the fastener. During the second half cycle, the cyclic load compresses the joint further into the plastic range; simultaneously, it reduces the fastener tension. Due to the permanent set in the compressed joint, the clamp load is decreased further at the end of the second half cycle of the service load. The cumulative clamp load loss due to the permanent set in both the fastener and the joint is analytically determined using a nonlinear model. Variables investigated in this study include the joint-to-fastener stiffness ratio, the ratio of the initial fastener tension to its elastic limit, and the ratio of the external force to its maximum tensile value that would trigger joint separation.

Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

(a) Fully reversed load; (b) fully reversed cyclic service load; and cbolted joint model

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Figure 2

Effect of external force in the elastic range–joint diagram

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Figure 3

Nonlinear joint diagram during the separating half cycle (9)

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Figure 4

Nonlinear joint diagram during the compressive half cycle

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Figure 5

Load deflection graphs for austenitic stainless-steel fastener and joint–joint diagram

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Figure 6

Effect of the tensile separating force on clamp load loss due to tension for stainless-steel fastener

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Figure 7

Effect of the external compressive force on clamp load loss

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Figure 8

Effect of the external force on total clamp load loss for stainless steel fastener

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Figure 9

Effect of the stiffness ratio on the cumulative clamp load loss (Fe∕Femax=1)

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Figure 10

True stress–true strain curves for various strain hardening rates (K-psi)

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Figure 11

Effect of strain hardening on clamp load loss

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Figure 12

Effect of strain hardening on clamp load loss (softer joints)

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Figure 13

Effect of preload level on clamp load loss during the separating half cycle (K-psi)

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Figure 14

Effect of preload level on clamp load loss during the compressive half cycle (K-psi)

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Figure 15

Effect of preload level on total clamp load loss for various strain hardening rates (K-psi)

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Figure 16

Effect of preload level on the cumulative clamp load loss for various strain hardening rates (K-psi)

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