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RESEARCH PAPERS

Numerical and Experimental Study of the Loaded Transmission Error of a Spiral Bevel Gear

[+] Author and Article Information
Jean-Pierre de Vaujany

 LDMS Laboratory, Bât J. d’Alembert, INSA of Lyon, 20 avenue, A. Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne, Francejean-pierre.devaujany@insa-lyon.fr

Michèle Guingand

 LDMS Laboratory, Bât J. d’Alembert, INSA of Lyon, 20 avenue, A. Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne, Francemichele.guingand@insa-lyon.fr

Didier Remond

 LDMS Laboratory, Bât J. d’Alembert, INSA of Lyon, 20 avenue, A. Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne, Francedidier.remond@insa-lyon.fr

Yvan Icard

Stress Department, EADS Eurocopter, 13725 Marignane, Franceyvan.icard@eurocopter.com

J. Mech. Des 129(2), 195-200 (Feb 08, 2006) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2406089 History: Received June 16, 2005; Revised February 08, 2006

The design of spiral bevel gears in aeronautical gear boxes requires very precise and realistic numerical simulations. One important criteria is the loaded transmission error (LTE) that gear designers attempt to reduce at the nominal torque. This paper presents a numerical tool that simulates the loaded meshing of spiral bevel gears and experimental tests carried out on a real helicopter gear box. Tooth profile is defined by the Gleason cutting process and tooth bending effects and contact deformations are both taken into account. The bending effect computation uses a three-dimensional finite element model, while the contact deformations are obtained by using Boussinesq’s theory. Experimental measurements of the LTE were performed using magnetic and optical encoders rigidly connected with the pinion and gear shafts, giving access to the records of the instantaneous angular positions. The numerical simulations fit quite well the experimental results.

Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 8

Simulated bearing pattern and kinematics error

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Figure 9

Finite element model of the pinion (6910 elements, 33,745 nodes)

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Figure 10

Finite element model of the gear (8890 elements, 43,645 nodes)

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Figure 11

Calculation of the influence coefficients

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Figure 12

Local meshing for one tooth

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Figure 13

Definition of the position to calculate TE

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Figure 14

Phase difference encoder

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Figure 15

Calculation of transmission error by the angular method

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Figure 23

Comparison of measured and simulated transmission error (130mN)

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Figure 22

Comparison of measured and simulated transmission error (65mN)

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Figure 20

Processed transmission error (200rpm and 65mN)

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Figure 19

Average of transmission error

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Figure 18

Transmission error without any treatment (200rpm and 65mN)

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Figure 7

Positions of the gear

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Figure 6

Meshing of the tooth flank

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Figure 5

Comparison between simulated surface and cut surface (ZEISS measurement)

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Figure 2

Rim with two webs

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Figure 1

Spiral bevel gear

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