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RESEARCH PAPERS

Load Sharing of Worm Gear With a Plastic Wheel

[+] Author and Article Information
Yann Hiltcher

LDMS Laboratory, Bâtiment J. d’Alembert—INSA of Lyon, 20, av. A. Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne, Franceyann.hiltcher@insa-lyon.fr

Michèle Guingand

LDMS Laboratory, Bâtiment J. d’Alembert—INSA of Lyon, 20, av. A. Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne, FranceMichele.guingand@insa-lyon.fr

Jean-Pierre de Vaujany

LDMS Laboratory, Bâtiment J. d’Alembert—INSA of Lyon, 20, av. A. Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne, FranceJean-pierre.devaujany@insa-lyon.fr

J. Mech. Des 129(1), 23-30 (Mar 01, 2006) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2359469 History: Received May 11, 2005; Revised March 01, 2006

The material of the wheel in a worm gear has to be nonrigid due to very high sliding velocity. Such gears are currently made of plastic in the case of a small module. The present paper describes an original method for studying the quasi-static loaded behavior of a worm gear, with a steel worm and a nylon wheel. Plastics are viscoelastic materials and do not obey Hooke’s law. This paper describes an elaborated method that is a generalization of Kelvin’s model. The computation also uses experimental tests to obtain data relating to the plastic. The computation of the load sharing is described and uses the equation of displacement compatibility. The history of previous deformation and the effect of the nylon’s structural damping are taken into account. At a given constant temperature, the load sharing, meshing stiffness, and loaded transmission error depend on the driving torque and time, that is to say speed of rotation.

Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Displacement and load not in phase

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Figure 5

Generalized Kelvin model

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Figure 8

Influence of temperature on displacement

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Figure 9

Influence of parameter χ on displacement

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Figure 10

Global body adjustment

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Meshing the potential zone of contact

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Meshing on the entire active flank

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Balance of the driving torque

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Influence of contact coefficients

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CATIA finite element (first computation)

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CATIA finite element (second computation)

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Gaps without load calculus

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Load sharing on five teeth

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Deformation according to frequency

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Deformation according to temperature (f=1Hz)

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Transmission error (T=80°C)

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Meshing stiffness (T=80°C)

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Meshing stiffness at several temperatures

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Figure 2

Amplitude of the displacement

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Phase between the displacement and the load

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Figure 4

Displacement in phase of a polymer

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Figure 26

Meshing stiffness (T=20°C)

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Result of generalized Kelvin model with great common ratio β

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Result of generalized Kelvin model with small common ratio β

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Average meshing stiffness according to the temperature

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Figure 25

Transmission error (T=20°C)

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