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RESEARCH PAPERS

Reduction of Stress Concentration in Bolt-Nut Connectors

[+] Author and Article Information
Sriman Venkatesan

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Ohio State University, 650 Ackerman Road, Suite 255, Columbus, OH 43201

Gary L. Kinzel1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Ohio State University, 650 Ackerman Road, Suite 255, Columbus, OH 43201kinzel.1@osu.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Mech. Des 128(6), 1337-1342 (Dec 16, 2005) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2336254 History: Received January 17, 2005; Revised December 16, 2005

Bolt-nut connectors play an important role in the safety and reliability of structural systems. Stress concentration due to unequal load distribution can cause fatigue failure in bolt-nut connectors. In this paper, the stress distribution in bolt-nut connectors is studied using an axisymmetric finite element model. Various geometric designs proposed in the literature were studied to determine the extent to which they reduce stress concentrations. Some well known modifications do significantly reduce the stress concentration factor (up to 85%) while other changes produce much more modest changes. The design modifications include things such as grooves and steps on the bolt and nut, and reducing the shank diameter of the bolt. All of the changes also result in a reduction in weight.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figure 1

Load and boundary conditions for the base model

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Finite element mesh and stress distribution at the contacting threads

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