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RESEARCH PAPERS

Mechanics and Sliding Friction in Belt Drives With Pulley Grooves

[+] Author and Article Information
Lingyuan Kong

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ohio State University, 650 Ackerman Rd., Columbus, OH 43202

Robert G. Parker1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ohio State University, 650 Ackerman Rd., Columbus, OH 43202parker.242@osu.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Mech. Des 128(2), 494-502 (Jun 23, 2005) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2168469 History: Received December 15, 2004; Revised June 23, 2005

The steady mechanics of a two-pulley belt drive system are examined where the pulley grooves, belt extension and wedging in the grooves, and the associated friction are considered. The belt is modeled as an axially moving string with the tangential and normal accelerations incorporated. The pulley grooves generate two-dimensional radial and tangential friction forces whose undetermined direction depends on the relative speed between belt and pulley along the contact arc. Different from single-pulley analyses, the entry and exit points between the belt spans and pulleys must be determined in the analysis due to the belt radial penetration into the pulley grooves and the coupling of the driver and driven pulley solutions. A new computational technique is developed to find the steady mechanics of a V-belt drive. This allows system analysis, such as speed/torque loss and maximum tension ratio. The governing boundary value problem (BVP) with undetermined boundaries is converted to a fixed boundary form solvable by a general-purpose BVP solver. Compared to flat belt drives or models that neglect radial friction, significant differences in the steady belt-pulley mechanics arise in terms of belt radial penetration, free span contact points, tension, friction, and speed variations.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: Pulleys , Belts , Tension
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References

Figures

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Figure 10

Belt sliding angles γ2 and γ1 along driver and driven contact arcs for the system specified in Table 1: (a) driver pulley and (b) driven pulley

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Figure 9

Belt inclination angles θ2 and θ1 along driver and driven contact arcs for the system specified in Table 1: (a) driver pulley and (b) driven pulley

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Figure 8

Belt radial penetrations along driver and driven contact arcs for the system specified in Table 1: (a) driver pulley and (b) driven pulley

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Figure 7

Variation of belt tractive tensions in belt-pulley contact zones with tight span tractive tension for the system specified in Table 1

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Figure 6

Variation of pulley (a) wrap angles and (b) torques with tight span tractive tension for the system specified in Table 1

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Figure 5

Steady solutions for the system specified in Table 1: (a)Tt=700N, (b)Tt=1200N, (c)Tt=3000N, and (d)Tt=5000N

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Figure 4

Search of the initial solution guess by trial and error

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Figure 3

Two-pulley belt drive with belt penetration into pulley grooves

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Figure 2

(a) Free body diagram of a moving curved string including belt inertia effect and (b) pulley velocity rω, belt segment velocity V(s), and relative speed Vs(s)

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Figure 1

Belt sliding in pulley grooves: (a) cross section and acting forces, and (b) velocities

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Figure 11

Variation of system power efficiency and driven pulley rotational speed with tight span tractive tension for the system specified in Table 1

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