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RESEARCH PAPERS

Analysis of Cord-Reinforced Poly-Rib Serpentine Belt Drive With Thermal Effect

[+] Author and Article Information
G. Song

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,  University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO 65409

K. Chandrashekhara1

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,  University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO 65409chandra@umr.edu

W. F. Breig, D. L. Klein, L. R. Oliver

 MarkIV Automotive, Springfield, MO 65808

1

Corresponding author.

J. Mech. Des 127(6), 1198-1206 (Mar 16, 2005) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2049088 History: Received July 02, 2004; Revised March 16, 2005

This paper investigates the operation of an automotive poly-rib serpentine belt system. A three-dimensional dynamic finite element model, consisting of a driver pulley, a driven pulley, and a complete five-rib V-ribbed belt, was created. Belt construction accounts for three different elastomeric compounds and a single layer of reinforcing cords. Rubber was considered incompressible hyperelastic material, and cord was considered linear elastic material. The material model accounting for thermal strains and temperature-dependent properties of the rubber solids was implemented in ABAQUS∕EXPLICIT code for the simulation. A tangential shear angle and an axial shear angle were defined to quantify shear deformations. The shear angles were found to be closely related to velocity variation along contact arc and the imbalanced contact stress distribution on different sides of the same rib and on different ribs. The temperature effect on shear deformation, tension and velocity variation, and contact stress distribution was investigated and shown in comparison to the results for the same system operating at room temperature.

Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Typical V-ribbed belt construction

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Figure 2

Multimode rubber tests: (a) uniaxial extension test, (b) biaxial extension test, and (c) planar extension test

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Figure 3

Temperature-dependent stress-strain data of rib rubber: (a) uniaxial extension test, (b) planar extension test, and (c) biaxial extension test

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Figure 4

Belt drive system configurations: (a) initial configuration and (b) final configuration

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Figure 5

Mesh of a single rib

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Figure 6

Deformed shape of the belt ribs inside pulley grooves

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Figure 7

Contact stress distribution at four positions on inside surface of rib 1 at driver contact at 23°C

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Figure 8

Contact stress distribution at four positions on inside surface of rib 1 at driven contact at 23°C

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Figure 9

Contact stress distribution on both sides of rib 1 at driver contact at 23 and 120°C

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Figure 10

Contact stress distribution on both sides of rib 1 at driven contact at 23 and 120°C

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Figure 11

Largest contact stresses on three neighboring ribs at driver contact at 23°C

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Figure 12

Largest contact stresses on three neighboring ribs at driver contact at 120°C

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Figure 13

Velocities at position A of driver and driven contacts at 23 and 120°C

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Figure 14

Tensile stress in top backing rubber layer at 23 and 120°C

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Figure 15

Definition of tangential shear angle

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Figure 16

Definition of axial shear angle

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Figure 17

Tangential shear angles at driver and driven contacts at 23 and 120°C

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Figure 18

Axial shear angles at both sides of driver contact at 23 and 120°C

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