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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Topological Synthesis of Compliant Mechanisms Using Spanning Tree Theory

[+] Author and Article Information
Hong Zhou

Center for Manufacturing Research, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN 38505

Kwun-Lon Ting

Center for Manufacturing Research, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN 38505kting@tntech.edu

J. Mech. Des 127(4), 753-759 (Jul 28, 2004) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1900148 History: Received March 04, 2004; Revised July 23, 2004; Accepted July 28, 2004

This paper introduces the spanning tree theory to the topological synthesis of compliant mechanisms, in which spanning trees connect all the vertices together using a minimum number of edges. A valid topology is regarded as a network connecting input, output, support, and intermediate nodes, which contains at least one spanning tree among the introduced nodes. Invalid disconnected topologies can be weeded out if no spanning tree is included. No further deformation analysis and performance evaluation is needed to invalidate disconnected topologies. Problem-dependent objectives are optimized for topological synthesis of compliant mechanisms. Constraints about maximum input displacement and force, maximum stress and overlapping connections are directly imposed during optimization process. The discrete optimization problem is solved by genetic algorithm with penalty function handling constraints. Two examples are given to verify the effectiveness of the proposed synthesis procedure.

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Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

A structural universal example

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Figure 2

A disconnected topology from the structural universal in Fig. 1

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Figure 3

A connected topology from the structural universal in Fig. 1

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Figure 4

The input, output and support ports in example 1

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Figure 5

The structural universal of example 1

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Figure 6

The topological synthesis result of example 1

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Figure 7

The evolutionary convergence history of example 1

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Figure 8

The input, output and support ports in example 2

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Figure 9

The structural universal of example 2

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Figure 10

The topological synthesis result of example 2

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Figure 11

The evolutionary convergence history of example 2

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