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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Smart Actuator Positioning and Displacement Transmissibility in Serial and Parallel Robot Manipulators for Performance Enhancement

[+] Author and Article Information
J. Rastegar, J. Zhang

Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794-2300

L. Yuan1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794-2300

1

Currently at: EDO Marine and Aircraft Systems, North Amityville, New York.

J. Mech. Des 127(4), 589-595 (Sep 14, 2004) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1898340 History: Received April 14, 2003; Revised September 14, 2004

A method is presented for the evaluation of the transmissibility of displacement from smart (active) actuators integrated in the structure of robot manipulators to the manipulator joint and end-effector displacements. The method is based on studying the characteristics of the Jacobian of the mapping function between the two displacements for a given position of the robot manipulator. The developed method provides a tool for the determination of the positioning of smart actuators to provide maximum effectiveness in eliminating high harmonics of the joint or the end-effector motion. In robots with serial and parallel kinematics chains containing nonprismatic joints, due to the associated kinematics nonlinearity, if the joint motions were synthesized with low harmonic trajectories, the end-effector trajectory would still contain high harmonics of the joint motions. Alternatively, if the end-effector motion were synthesized with low harmonic components, due to the inverse kinematics nonlinearity, the actuated joint trajectories would contain a significant high harmonic component. As a result, the operating speed and tracking precision are degraded. By integrating smart materials based actuators in the structure of robot manipulators to provide small amplitude and high frequency motions, the high harmonic component of the actuated joint and/or the end-effector motions can be significantly reduced, thereby making it possible to achieve higher operating speed and tracking precision.

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Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

A plane 2R robot manipulator with smart materials based actuators integrated into its two links.

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Figure 2

A plane two degrees-of-freedom robot manipulator with a closed-loop chain

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Figure 3

Displacement transmissibility from smart actuators integrated into the links l3 (solid lines) or l5 (dashed lines) to the actuated joint rotations for different positioning of the end-effector

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Figure 4

Displacement transmissibility from smart actuators integrated into the links l3 and l6 to the actuated joint rotations for different positioning of the end-effector

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Figure 5

Displacement transmissibility from smart actuators integrated into the links l1 (solid lines) or l3 (dashed lines) to the end-effector displacement in the task coordinate system for different positioning of the end-effector

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Figure 6

Displacement transmissibility from smart actuators integrated into the links l2 and l5 to the end-effector displacement in the task space for different positioning of the end-effector

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Figure 7

A plane three degrees-of-freedom parallel robot manipulator

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Figure 8

Displacement transmissibility from a smart actuator integrated into the link b1 (solid lines) or b2 (dashed lines) to the actuated joint β2 and the joint β1 for different positioning of the end-effector

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Figure 9

Displacement transmissibility from the smart actuators integrated into the links a1 and b1 to the end-effector displacement for different positioning of the end-effector

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