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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Analysis of Active Joint Failure in Parallel Robot Manipulators

[+] Author and Article Information
Mahir Hassan

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Queen’s University, McLaughlin Hall, 130 Stuart Street, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6e-mail: mhassan@me.queensu.ca

Leila Notash

Department of Mechanical Engineering Queen’s University, McLaughlin Hall, 130 Stuart Street, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6e-mail: notash@me.queensu.ca

J. Mech. Des 126(6), 959-968 (Feb 14, 2005) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1798071 History: Received July 14, 2003; Revised February 25, 2004; Online February 14, 2005
Copyright © 2004 by ASME
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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
A 6-DOF parallel robot (F-200i) from FANUC Robotics Inc.
Grahic Jump Location
Schematic diagrams of illustrating examples of planar and spatial parallel manipulators with various λi values. (a) Planar (λ1=2,λ2=3, and λ3=2), (b) spatial (λ1=3,λ2=3, and λ3=3), (c) spatial (λ1=3,λ2=6, and λ3=3), and (d) spatial (λ1=3,λ2=6, and λ3=4).
Grahic Jump Location
A schematic diagram of 6-DOF 3-3 Stewart-Gough platform
Grahic Jump Location
Trajectories of the 3-3 Stewart-Gough manipulator for no-failure case. (a) Mobile platform position trajectory, (b) mobile platform orientation trajectory, and (c) active joint trajectory.
Grahic Jump Location
Trajectories of the 3-3 Stewart-Gough manipulator in case of active joint jam in branch 4 occurring at 60% of the desired task trajectory; post-failure trajectory was achieved by projecting the desired task trajectory onto csp(Ja); denoted by projcsp(Ja)(ẋ). (a) Mobile platform position trajectory, (b) mobile platform orientation trajectory, and (c) active joint trajectory.
Grahic Jump Location
Trajectories of the 3-3 Stewart-Gough manipulator in case of active joint jam in branch 4 occurring at 60% of the desired task trajectory; post-failure trajectory was achieved by maintaining the desired px,pyxyz, and making pz dependent to satisfy [N(JaT)]T ẋ=0. (a) Mobile platform position trajectory, (b) mobile platform orientation trajectory, and (c) active joint trajectory.
Grahic Jump Location
Trajectories of the 3-3 Stewart-Gough manipulator in case of actuator force loss in branch 4 occurring at 60% of the desired task trajectory; only the failed joint was allowed to undergo unconstrained movement under the effect of the end-effector weight while the other active joints were locked; post-failure unconstrained motion was along projnsp(Ja−1)(ẋ). (a) Mobile platform position trajectory, (b) mobile platform orientation trajectory, and (c) active joint trajectory.

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