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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Decomposition-Based Assembly Synthesis for In-Process Dimensional Adjustability

[+] Author and Article Information
Byungwoo Lee, Kazuhiro Saitou

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2125

J. Mech. Des 125(3), 464-473 (Sep 04, 2003) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1587746 History: Received April 01, 2002; Online September 04, 2003
Copyright © 2003 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Examples of decomposition and joint configuration for dimensional adjustment. The design in (b) provides adjustability along the critical dimension, while the design in (a) lacks proper slip planes.
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Examples of decomposition and joint configuration for non-forced fit. The design in (b) provides slip planes that can absorb manufacturing variation of each part, while the design in (a) lacks the proper configuration of slip planes.
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The basic joint configurations for sheet metal assemblies 11
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A product geometry and its liaison diagram
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Binary decomposition is shown both on product geometry (left) and its liaison diagram (right). Removing a cut-set from the liaison diagram resulted in a pair of connected graphs.
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A decomposition and its joint configuration is depicted. The joint configuration is a set of normal vectors associated with the cut-set of the decomposition.
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Two assembly sequences for the car floor pan 16. In figure (a) part 2 and 3 are assembled first and then part 1 is assembled. It is possible that the manufacturing variation of part 1 makes the KC unattainable. However, the sequence shown in figure (b) provides the slip plane at the moment the KC is achieved, so that the slip plane can absorb any variation in length involved with the KC.
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The car floor pan with two KCs is shown in (a). Two assembly sequences with different joint configurations are shown in (b) and (c) 16. While the assembly sequence in (b) achieves two KCs at a time with only one slip plane (between part 2 and 3), that of (c) achieves two KCs in sequence with one slip plane for each KC.
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Two different assembly sequences for a decomposition (a) are shown in (b) and (c). While, in figure (b), the joint configuration at the second assembly operation does not absorb possible manufacturing variations from the first assembly operation and part 1, those in figure (b) does absorb the manufacturing variations, thus enables non-forced fit.
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Examples of configurations that need further decompositions
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A partial AND/OR graph of the simple rectangular box (Fig. 5). Note that the graph is constructed from the top to the bottom as the assembly synthesis is being conducted and it reads from the bottom to the top when an assembly sequence is extracted.
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Algorthim BUILD_AO to generate the AND/OR graph of assembly synthesis
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The AND/OR graph for the simple rectangular box in Fig. 5
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All final designs with accompanying assembly sequences interpreted from the AND/OR graph in Fig. 13
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An automotive side aperture design (a) borrowed from 12 is simplified in (b) with a few KCs assumed. Figure (c) shows the liaison diagram of the initial geometry.
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A partial AND/OR graph of assembly synthesis for the aperture design in Fig. 15(b)
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All final designs with accompanying assembly sequences interpreted from the AND/OR graph in Fig. 18. Since the AND/OR graph in Fig. 16 is partial, neither final designs nor assembly sequences for each final design are listed completely.
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Nonstrict cases for the decomposition rules for dimensional adjustability (a) and the decomposition rule for non-forced fit (b).
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(a) The DFC of the final design in Fig. 17(a) and (b) the DFC of the final design in Fig. 17(e).

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